Gentleman’s Guide Star Jefferson Mays on Being Trained Like a Dog, the Best Way to Die and Keeping His Tony Award Out of the House

first_img Is this your usual East Village attire? I am not tattooed or pierced, for the record. You performed on stage with Claire Danes and Hugh Dancy in the same year. Can you offer any insight into that celebrity couple? I got them together! Just kidding. They did invite us to their wedding, which was very nice. I love her—and him—but Claire is so smart and brave. Imagine Eliza Doolittle as your first stage role? It’s unfathomable. She was extraordinary and gracious—a great, generous scene partner. Are you as much of an Anglophile as you seem to be? I’m kind of a reluctant Anglophile. My mother’s a children’s librarian and all of the children’s literature I read was from her childhood—E. Nesbit and Dickens, which isn’t children’s literature at all, but I was sort of steeped in English literature. I thought I was of that world. That’s interesting because so many interviews I’ve read with you seem like you live in another era, read Dickens and go to sleep. I don’t want to give you the wrong impression, though we do that, too. You’ve been living with the D’Ysquiths of Gentleman’s Guide for quite a while now—first at Hartford Stage and then at San Diego’s Old Globe. Yes, and they are wretched people. I’ve been involved with the show on and off for about three years now. What was your first response to the material? I loved it because I so loved that Ealing Studio comedy from the ’50s called Kind Hearts and Coronets, which was based on the same source material as The Gentleman’s Guide. I saw that when I was about nine or 10 years old, and I was just gobsmacked by it. I fell in love with Alec Guinness, and maybe even fell in love with acting. One man could play all of these different roles! See Jefferson Mays in A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder at the Walter Kerr Theatre. Have there been many mishaps? At the end of the first day of tech, I went up to [costume designer Linda Cho] and said, “I love the costumes, but there’s one thing that’s just terribly wrong.” And she sort of went ashen and said, “What?!” And I said, “There’s no zipper. I can’t pee.” That’s the first thing that comes to mind—a last little detail. Jefferson Mays, who was the talk of the town and took home a Tony Award for playing multiple roles in I Am My Own Wife almost 10 years ago, is at it again. This time the actor is playing all of the many doomed members of the D’Ysquith family in the new musical comedy A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Mays, who is known for his genteel manner, snappy suits and detailed performances, has also appeared on Broadway in Journey’s End, Pygmalion and The Best Man. He sat down for a cozy breakfast with Broadway.com at his local cafe in the East Village to chat about the intricacies of his many onstage quick changes, eccentric childhood obsessions and the art of dying again and again. Related Shows How do you come up with specific minutiae and bits for so many different roles without losing your mind? Some would argue I have lost my mind. The beauty of performance for me is finding details with which to betray character. My beautiful, long-suffering wife Susan will get up from bed to go to the bathroom and find me in the kitchen—I’ve rearranged all of the furniture to resemble the stage, and I’ll be practicing things with a plate or forks or a newspaper or something. Who were your childhood idols? Oh, God. They were very odd. Lord Nelson. I loved Lord Nelson, the great naval admiral. I loved Alec Guinness and Ralph Richardson, and my parents, of course. It’s fascinating how much thought you’ve put into this, but I meant on stage! There are ways to die on stage that elicit more of a reaction from the audience, but they cause me great pain and suffering. Like falling off the tower. I’m standing on one leg, and I have to go backwards and flail my arms around wildly and fall to the ground. It just hurts me and there’s no joy in that, but the audience seems to enjoy it. What is the best way to die? I think freezing to death. I mean I’ve never done it myself, but I hear that freezing to death is just like going to sleep. You hear about these people who almost die on Everest and they’re like, “Oh, go on. I’ll just take a nap here in the snow.” And the hypothermia sets in. It’s not that dramatic but wouldn’t you prefer that? Drowning can be like that I guess, but wouldn’t you rather freeze? Oh, I guess we all just want to die in our sleep and not screaming. You didn’t have rock stars on your walls, did you? I didn’t. Everyone had a Farrah Fawcett Majors poster on the wall or the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders. I didn’t. I had kind of the same thing, though. I had pre-Raphaelite prints from the Tate of the Lady Shalott and Hylas and the Nymphs, which was this young man being dragged into a pool by these bare-breasted redheaded, limpid-eyed naiads. Oh, and I had one of Ophelia by Millais. All of my crushes were dead. It’s easy to imagine the D’Ysquiths all around a table. It certainly is. There’s a wonderful moment in Kind Hearts and Coronets where they are all sitting in the family chapel, and it pans across and there’s Alec Guiness, Alec Guiness, Alec Guiness. Star Files A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder You’re fully trained now? I am housebroken. View Comments There is such elaborate backstage choreography. You must be very close to your dresser. My dresser [Julian Andres Arango] is wonderful. He’s very calm—he does a lot of Bikram yoga. He’s an actor–whisperer. He has a series of hand signals for me ‘cause we can’t really bellow at each other offstage while scenes are going on. It makes me feel like a Westminster Dog Show Airedale. I’ll come running offstage and Julian will just go [puts up his hand in a halt position], and I’ll go [pants like a dog]. You have so many costume changes. Is it stressful? It is. And being naked in the wings is terribly vulnerable. I often fear that my performance is less artistic than athletic. It’s quite a marathon. Do you have a favorite D’Ysquith? They all go by so quickly; it’s hard to get too attached to any of them. There’s one who is the banker. He isn’t terribly funny, but he’s very humane and he has a trajectory, too. He doesn’t just come on and die. I have to fact check here: Is it true that you’ve given all your awards to your agent? Yes. I haven’t given them away, but I’ve loaned them to my agent like Elgin marbles. But yeah, they’re there at the agency ‘cause there’s no room in our apartment. A Tony Award isn’t that big. I love the awards, and I’m grateful, but I don’t want to have them around. Actually, if you came to our house, I don’t think you could tell that people in the theater lived there. There’s nothing: no posters, no awards, no photographs, no souvenirs of any kind. It’s a sixth floor walk-up. You cannot be sentimental. There isn’t any surface for it. I mean we could make a shelf, but I resent having to make a new shelf for something. I remember when I brought [the Tony Award] home thinking the only place it could really fit is the toilet tank, and that just didn’t seem right. Of all the characters you’ve played, which are closest to you? Once you’ve played a part, they are always sort of a part of you. You think of them as almost a family member. When I was younger—I don’t do this too much now—but sometimes if I couldn’t sleep, I would lie in bed and imagine all the characters I’ve played at a dinner table together. This is your first musical in New York. How does it feel to be a Broadway musical theater actor? It’s chilling when you put it that way. It’s amazing listening to old cast recordings of old musicals. You hear every cigarette and every whiskey that these people had. They were not pretty voices; they were potent voices. Now you have these Olympic athletes. And so that’s hard to think about sometimes because I’m not a trained singer. I don’t think of it in terms of singing, I just think of it in terms of acting. You’ve played multiple roles before, most notably in I Am My Own Wife. Is this your specialty? It’s quite a different experience in that Charlotte von Mahlsdorf and everybody were wearing a little black dress. Everyone was a transvestite by default. Here, the transformations are complete. You’ve said you don’t have a television. In what ways do you indulge in pop culture? We have a laptop where we watch certain shows. We’re fixated on The Walking Dead right now. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 17, 2016 You look very dashing in your fedora and suit. I always dress up for recordings. Jefferson Mayslast_img read more

Moving Checklist

first_imgSix weeks prior to moveContact a real estate agent in the local area. Start by looking in the Military Buyer’s Guide of this publication.Obtain quotes from moving and self-service companies and gather DIY estimates. Decide on the type of move best for your circumstances.Determine employer-covered expenses.Four weeks prior to moveCheck the preregistration procedures to enroll children in school. Get children’s transcripts, textbook list and a copy of their current school’s grading system. Ask teachers to write descriptions of each student’s achievement level, interests and any unusual courses taken.Request that copies of all family members’ medical and dental records and birth certificates be sent to your new home. Don’t forget your pets’ veterinary records.Notify the post office of your new address and obtain a change-of-address kit. Send change-of-address cards to friends, subscription services, creditors, alumni associations, the Department of Motor Vehicles and insurance companies.Begin packing seldom-used items and dispose of unwanted items through charities — get receipts for tax purposes.Contact the IRS for forms and regulations regarding tax-deductible moving expenses.Transfer or arrange for insurance to cover your home, furnishings and automobile.Three weeks prior to moveArrange to have appliances, utilities, newspapers, laundry, phone and cable television disconnected. Check on deposits. Set up connections at your new home.Make travel arrangements.Two weeks prior to moveHandle bills, stocks, investments and banking transfers.Arrange to transport pets and plants. Some states prohibit certain plants, so research before you move.Clean cupboards and plan remaining meals so you can pack what you don’t need.One week prior to moveDiscontinue delivery services such as the newspapers.Clean and sort items in the garage and attic.Clean out your safety deposit box and place all valuables and documents together. If the items can’t be replaced, carry them with you.Two days prior to moveDefrost and dry refrigerators and freezers.Arrange for cash or traveler’s checks for trip expenses and payment to the mover upon delivery.Reconcile and close checking account. Withdraw savings.Conclude any financial matters relating to the lease or sale of your home.Pack luggage. Set aside items you will need immediately upon arrival — a few dishes, pots and pans, towels, soap, bedding, light bulbs, flashlights and toilet paper.Leave a forwarding address with new tenant or neighbor.Moving dayConfirm your delivery date with your mover and provide directions to your new residence as well as primary and secondary contact numbers or email addresses.Pay close attention to the mover’s paperwork. You will need to sign it upon completion of loading and then unloading at your new residence.Supervise the movers to make sure your instructions are understood. Review any damage to your belongings noted by the moving foreman or supervisor.Double-check your residence for forgotten items before leaving.Move-in dayClear and mark paths to all rooms to help the movers place the boxes.Supervise unloading.Note any damage to your boxes or furniture.Review paperwork carefully to make sure all your belongings arrived.last_img read more

Otso Waheela C gets early release of new Slate & Gray, all forks move…

first_imgBy now, you may be getting familiar with the Otso features, particularly their Tuning Chip dropout system. The three position adjustable dropout alters the chainstay length by up to 20 mm, while it also raises and lowers the BB to compensate for the change in ride height for different tires. At its longest setting, the frame can run up to 29 x 2.1″ tires or 700c x 53mm.Otso previously shipped each bike with a fork that included a 15mm thru axle. That eventually shifted to riders having the option of choosing either a 15mm or 12mm axle. Now, based on customer feedback and choices, all bikes will only be shipped with a 12mm thru axle. It seems that in the road and gravel world, 12mm has become the preferred standard up front. If you’ve been shopping for a new bike, then you already know that the increased demand has made things pretty scarce. That’s part of the reason why Otso is releasing the fourth new color of their awesome Waheela C all road / gravel / dropbar MTB a bit early. Originally slated for a 2021 release, the new color is available now – just in time for fall exploring. The frames are constructed using EPS molded carbon fiber and include a number of mounting options, internal cable routing including dropper post compatibility (options for 60mm or 100mm travel in their bike builder), and a 68mm threaded BSA bottom bracket.The Matte Slate / Gray, joins six other colors that are partially available depending on the frame size required. Framesets start at $2,200 and complete bikes start at $3,600, with plenty of spec options available through the custom bike configurator.otsocycles.comlast_img read more

Campagnolo Launches U.S. 11-Speed Demo Tour

first_imgPRESS RELEASE: ?After two years, the 11-speed revolution has evolved always maintaining the same objective: achieving ever better performances.The team of professional racers and enthusiasts who over the last two years have been riding 11-speed groupsets, and the great work carried out by Campy Tech Lab™ engineers has enabled us, to raise the bar and reach another goal: Improving products that already represent a benchmark on the market.Revolution11 is the result of technical refinements that have led the 11-speed drivetrains to obtain shifting performances like never before and lose weight, thanks to special materials and innovative technical solutions.Campagnolo wants to be even closer to enthusiasts and to the Campagnolo Proshop network. Aware of the fact that the only way to appreciate the quality and authenticity of Campagnolo’s products is to try them in store, Campagnolo has decided to launch the Revolution 11 Test Tour.The US Revolution 11 Test Tour had his first stage on October 9th in Encinitas, California: it will be a series of road shows held in Campagnolo’s best Pro-shops. By going to their nearest participating Pro-shop, enthusiasts will find bicycles fitted with Campagnolo’s brand new groupsets and will be able to test theiroutstanding performance themselves. Those participating in the test will receive a free Revolution11 T-shirt.Click here for dates and locations.last_img read more

Interbike 2011: Fondriest SF1 inox (stainless) frameset

first_imgAt 980g for the frame, this Fondriest shows that steel can hang with more modern materials, and the addition of a 375g carbon fiber fork, Ritchey Classic seatpost and headset up the balance of this $4,900 package.  Can I justify it?  No.  Would I have come home with it if my budget allowed?  Yes.marcwww.fondriestbici.comwww.albabici.com It’s another fragrant morning here in Las Vegas as the Bikerumor crew pore through the images from the first day of 2011’s Interbike Expo.  From day 1, the one object that drew me in from the aisles more strongly than anything else had to have been Fondriest’s SF1 stainless steel frame, distributed in the US by Albabici. Hit the jump for more photos and the weight & cost bottom lines…Despite what seemed like impossibly thin-walled tubes, sand blasted logos, and joints that look to have been applied by a syringe, the SF1 could have be described as understated- save for the polished stainless steel finish.  The seat clamp area comes together very nicely, as seen in the photos.last_img read more

Paris-Nice 2016 Tech: Dimension Data puts Rotor UNO on backup bikes, CeramicSpeed on anything…

first_imgThe latest cranks from Rotor are the 2INpower dual sided power meter crankset. It uses the spindle-mounted strain gauge of the original, single-sided INpower cranks with a second strain gauge inside the right crank arm: The Dimension Data pro cycling team had two sets of Cervelo S5 bikes on hand. The majority were equipped with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 handling the shifting, but a few were sitting atop team cars with the new Rotor UNO hydraulic shifting group. Starting with the former, the spec mostly carries over from what we saw at the Tour de France last year when they were called MTN-Qhubeka. That means ENVE wheels, bar and stem, Continental tires and Rotor cranks.This time around, we took a closer look at the CeramicSpeed upgrades and photo’d the all-hydraulic backup bikes… After giving the crankset a back spin, we inquired about the setup because it moves effortlessly. Even brand new bikes sitting on the showroom floor don’t spin this freely. The reason? They’ve replaced every moving part except the pedal’s bearings with CeramicSpeed components. That includes the headset, hub bearings, bottom bracket and derailleur pulley wheels. They also use CeramicSpeed’s lube oil on the chain, which is outside the intended use parameters, but when your bikes are cleaned and maintained daily, you can get away with stuff like that.Interestingly, they’re not running the massively oversized CS pulley wheels introduced last fall. We didn’t get a chance to ask why, but it’s likely because a sponsor like Shimano wouldn’t take too kindly to such modifications (though it doesn’t seem to stop Cannondale)center_img This bike shows what a full hydraulic component group will look like (it’s still chain driven, of course).The lever body contains the master cylinder for the brakes, but none is required for the shifting system because it’s completely closed. Check our tech breakdown of the entire group for more the deep dive. These hoods look big, but Rotor’s said they could probably offer a smaller size option for those with smaller hands.We’ll be riding UNO in early April with the engineers at Rotor, stay tuned for a first ride report.If you’ve seen Acros’ hydraulic shifters and derailleurs, you’ll notice UNO uses just one single hose rather than two. That’s possible thanks to a clever ratcheting system that either catches and holds, or releases, depending on how far it’s pushed.These rather large connectors in the brake lines allow bleed-free disconnects between the levers and the Magura RT8 hydraulic rim brake calipers. These don’t look quite like the stock offerings from Magura.They have an external dial sticking out and up from the center mounting bolt, which looks like it could simply be a pad contact adjustment / release mechanism to speed wheel changes.last_img read more

EB14: For KTM, Team Orange is the New Cross, Plus Codeveloped Road Disc

first_imgAustrian bike specialists showed a few pretty eye catching new 700c disc-brake bikes at Eurobike, marking their 50th anniversary. The standout was probably their cross bike mainly because of its blaze orange matte paint job. All of the new bikes in their road disc series were developed together for this year and share a bunch of tech features and nice detailing. Follow past the break for a breakdown of the details and a look at the whole series… The all-new €2900 Revelator Sky is a disc-brake version of their popular road race bike, but with more laid back geometry better suited as an endurance or gran fondo road bikeThe €3700 Ultegra Di2 version of the Revelator Sky has a much more stealthy build. The series uses a semi-sloping top tube design with an internal expander wedge seatpost clamp to leave a lot of 27.2 post hanging out to add a little ride comfort. Long for road, short for cross stays mean plenty of tire clearance and hit the bottom bracket junction in a wide, flat profile for drivetrain stiffness and all day comfort. All cable routing is internal, and for cross this might be a bit of an issue as is makes for a small mud shelf right where the internally routed front derailleur wire comes out, but at least KTM has though to include a rummer grommet.  All bikes feature PressfitBBs and really have some great paint jobs , with amazing detailing. Each of the road disc series incorporates a tapered 1.25-1.125″ front-end and thru-axles front and rear using the 100/15 and 142/12 that thankfully are solidifying as industry standards. The thru-axles make for very lightweight and strong carbon dropouts with continuous fibers looped from seatstay to chainstay. They also pair well with the Shimano Flat Mount disc tabs on both the new frames and forks. For now that means the bikes get adapters, but its a sign of lower-profile disc calipers to come.Check our coverage of their mountain bikes here.KTM-bikes.at The standout €3000 carbon framed KTM Canic CXC cyclocross bike comes spec’d with a hydraulic Ultegra kit. An aluminum version with the same frame features is also available with 105 for €1500.last_img read more

Easton Introduces More Road Tubeless, Better Hubs; EC90 Aero 55 – The Single Wheelset…

first_imgWhen new wheels were spotted under triathlete Andreas Raelert at Ironman Austria, the lack of hiding them suggested an imminent release. Well, here they are, along with a whole lot more. Not only have the 55mm EC90 Aero wheels been completely redesigned, the road line up gets a boost with new hubs, tubeless compatibility, wide rims, and more freehub selections!Ratchet past the break for more details… While most of the new developments are wrapped up in the all new EC90 Aero 55, other wheels in the line up benefit from the technology trickling down. Called the Single Wheelset Arsenal, the new Aero 55 seems to have all the bases covered – they’re light, aero, clincher, tubular, and tubeless, and have much improved hubs.A big part of the new design is the Fantom rim – a much wider rim that improved drastically over the previous shape which is now found on all EC90 wheels. Now 21mm wide, and 19mm internally, the rim is 6mm wider than the previous EC90 Aero 56, while 1mm shallower.At least according to Easton’s data, the Fantom is radically better than the 2012 Ec90 Aero, while also appearing to be quite a bit better at yaw angles of 12.5 degrees than the competitors. Due to the blunt nose of the Fantom rim, it is also more stable in cross winds – something that becomes more important the more aero you go. The result is a more rideable, aerodynamic wheel for all conditions.In addition to tubular rims, the Aero 55 will be offered in a tubeless clincher version as well. Using Easton’s Eyelet Nipple system, the nipples thread into the eyelets allowing for a sealed rim bed, therefore tubeless. Certified for Road Tubeless even without sealant, the Aero 55 is one of the first carbon tubeless road wheels on the market.Along with the rim, big changes have been made to the hubs as well with the introduction of the all new Echo system. While the performance of the previous R4 system wasn’t exactly stellar, the Echo looks to address all of the previous issues with an intriguing design and a host of improvements. The biggest of which would be the positioning of the bearings which resulted in an all new freehub design.On the R4 hubs, the load bearings were located in the center of the hub far from the dropout which created a lot of leverage on them which is bad for bearing life. The Echo system places the load bearings as far apart as possible which should drastically improve bearing life. This design required a new freehub though, so Easton rethought the design and the pawls now reside in the hub body instead of the freehub body. Taking things a step further, the two center bearings are now angular contact bearings as well, further increasing durability. All of the new road wheels are compatible with Campy, Shimano, and Sram 9/10/11.Part of the cassette body redesign resulted in the engagement increasing from 12 to 7° for improved efficiency especially out of corners. Since the straight pull spoke flanges are separated from the bearing bores, bearing performance can be kept consistent regardless of spoke tension. The hubs also include an improved QR skewer with an internal cam mechanism. If you haven’t caught on, the focus for the new wheels across the line is durability, decreased maintenance, and improved power transfer.EC90 Aero 55 wheels will be available this fall for $2,400 for the 1330g tubular set and $2,800 for the 1580g tubeless clincher.As mentioned, Echo and Tubeless Road technology also makes their way into the aluminum wheel line like the new EA90 SLX. At 1400g, the tubeless road wheelset looks good with a 22mm external width and 17.5mm internal. Built with the same Echo hubset as the Aero 55s (also found on all other EA90 and EC90 wheels), the EA90 SLX feature 16/20 ft/rr spoking with double butted straight pull spokes. EA90 SLX wheels will retail for $1200.Currently Echo hubsets and tubeless rims can be found on the EC90 Aero 55 clincher and tubular, and EA90 SLX and SL wheelsets, with another tubeless option in the EA90 XD cross wheelset. Wider rims are found across the board, all the way down to the new 22mm wide EA70 and EA70 SL wheels. For more information check out Easton Cycling.last_img read more

EB15: Ritchey adds more cyclocross, gravel & road wheels, nifty mini tools and world’s…

first_imgEvery year, Ritchey has some new iteration of his wheels. Sometimes there’s a new disc brake option, sometimes one’s a bit wider, and so forth. For 2016, there are four new models worthy of calling out, a couple of which will make for fantastic cyclocross or gravel race hoops, and two for more traditional (or even “classic”) road bikes.Above, the new WCS Apex 38 Disc carbon wheels use their two-piece Centerlock disc hubs with all-new, disc specific 38mm deep carbon rims. They’re 18.4mm wide on the inside, and they’re tubeless ready, so they’ll pair up nicely with the also-new tubeless ready Shield WCS 700×35 tires… The rims get their own special layup and resin for the disc brake version. They’re laced 2-cross with 24 spokes on both front and rear.The Shield WCS tubeless ready tire weighs in at 398g, just 24g heavier than the non-tubeless version, and gets a 120tpi casing and dual compound rubber to be grippy in the corners and fast in the straights.The hubs use Ritchey’s offset flanges to improve spoke bracing angle and keep them from rubbing against each other. The rear hub has larger bearings on the driveside for better durability. Wheelset weight is 1,747g (827g F/920g R). Compatible with standard quick release and thru axles.A rim brake version is also available, weighing in at 1,560g (685g F/875g R), but uses the Phantom hubs (see below), which are QR only.If your game is stepped up to tubulars (though we’d argue tubeless is on the level), the new WCS Apex Carbon 36 Disc Tubulars are your wheels. They use the same hubs as the 38mm deep clinchers above, but switch to a 36mm deep, 24mm wide full carbon tubular rim. That means they’re thru-axle ready, including both 12mm and 15mm options for front. Weight is 1,571g (739g F/832g R).The SuperLogic Zeta II wheels may look like carbon at first glance, but they’re actually alloy with an electro-ceramic surface hardening treatment that both protects the rim and improves braking performance in wet conditions.Called LogiCote, it’s micron thin but should last a long time, which has the bonus effect of helping your rims last longer because the brake pads won’t wear down the sidewalls as quickly.It’s textured, but in a concentric pattern that shouldn’t make the squealing sounds that other textured braking surfaces can (Mavic, we’re looking at you…even though we love the performance of Exalith).The rims are 17mm wide on the inside, and the rear has an asymmetric profile to improve dish.These wheels claim to have Ritchey’s best stiffness to weight ratio, coming in at just 1,391g (593g F/798g R). They’re built with 20/24 DT Aero Comp spokes and alloy nipples laced to Ritchey’s Phantom Flange hubs. The hubs are impressive not just for their weights (70g F/207g R), but because they use J-bend spokes all around, have a 6-pawl, 12-point engagement and staggered driveside flange that keeps the spokes from rubbing together. On top of all that, they pop apart without tools, making them easier to pack if you’re using one of Ritchey’s growing line of Breakaway frames. How? because the freehub body can pop off with the cassette attached, letting the axle slide out and making it all very flat.For those with a classic bike that wants to keep a classic look but gain modern day performance, the Zeta alloy wheels with Phantom hubs now come in silver. For thoroughly modern, the new WCS Carbon Solostreem integrated bar/stem comes in at just 350g by molding the two parts together into an ergonomic, aerodynamic start to your cockpit. It’s available in three widths, with various stem lengths for each: 40cm (80/90/100mm), 42cm (90/100/110/120mm) and 44cm (90/100/110/120/130mm). All three have a 84º stem angle (read: -16º, or roughly flat), with 126mm drop and 75mm reach.To go with your ‘cross or gravel bike, the new Evomax handlebar comes in two flavors – WCS with triple butted 7050 alloy at 270g and Comp in double butted 6061 at 292g. It’s designed with a 12º outward flare to the drops, giving you extra wrist clearance and leverage when it’s boogie time. A slightly flattened top section with 4º backsweep makes it comfortable the rest of the time.Check our outdoor demo coverage for the full story on the new WCS XC pedals and their Trail counterpart, but here’s the nutshell: Better shoe support thanks to flattened platforms on either side of the pedal, and a fixed hook at the front makes engagement and disengagement quicker and more solid and reliable.All of the changes were the result of feedback from sponsored riders like Nino Schurter and crew…though they ended up much beefier than some of the prototypes they were running last year. That means weight went up a bit, to 298g, from the 240g per pair of the originals we tested. The new Trail version weighs in at 347g per pair thanks to the outer cage that gives you more foot support.For the non pros, there’s the new Comp pedal, which gets the same fixed front cleat hook and platforms, but in a bit heavier and much more colorful package. Weight is 331g with a cast alloy body and chromoly spindle.The new WCS TrueGrip X lock-on grips bring things about as thin as you can get. Grip diameter is just 30mm, putting just a thin layer of Kraton dual density material between your palm and the bar. Weight is 93g, width is 103mm, and they’re available in black, red, yellow, green, blue and light blue. A Comp level version provides a slip-on version that does away with the lock rings but adds pink and white colors.The star of the grip show is the new SuperLogic Ergo TrueGrip. The shape is fantastically comfortable, and it’s been available as a WCS edition before, but that one weighed in at a portly 36g without end plugs. Thanks to a new “ultra-light nano foam”, the SuperLogic version cuts that all the way down to 8.5g…for the pair!Two new tools join the collection. In the middle are the Barkeeper Levers. They tuck into your handlebar ends when not needed, saving a bit of space in your saddle bag or pocket. They weigh in at 16g and retail for $15 each, sold individually.Up front, the CPR12 mini tool combines all the basics into a light, compact package and doesn’t skimp – there’s even a chain breaker! Other tools include 2/3/4/5/6/8 hex keys, Torx T20, Phillips screwdriver, tire lever and a hidden bottle opener. Hopefully they’ll switch that to a T25 at some point, otherwise a great looking tool that’s just 92g.Ritchey also had several new items at Eurobike’s outdoor demo, including the Ascent touring bike, a steel trail hardtail mountain bike and some aggressive looking tires to go with it, and more! Check them all out here.RitcheyLogic.comcenter_img Gorgeous.Bridging the gap between classic and new is the WCS Carbon NeoClassic handlebar. It’s a modern carbon monocoque bar with matte UD finish, but its shape is the traditional round bend and long, flat lower hand position of old-school handlebars. Weight is 339g for a 42cm width. Reach is 73mm, drop is 128mm. The center section is extended so it’s compatible with clip-on aero bars and all manner of out-front computer/camera mounts.last_img read more

Annaleigh Ashford in Midsummer Night’s Dream & More Shakespeare in the Park Casting

first_img Current Sunday in the Park with George star Annaleigh Ashford, Danny Burstein, John Douglas Thompson, Corey Stoll and more Broadway stars lead the initial casting for the 2017 Free Shakespeare in the Park season, set for the Delacorte Theatre in Central Park. As previously announced, Oskar Eustis will direct Julius Caesar from May 23-June 18, followed by A Midsummer Night’s Dream running July 11-August 13 under the direction of Lear deBessonet.Julius Caesar will feature Tina Benko (Calpurnia), Teagle F. Bougere (Casca), Eisa Davis (Decius Brutus), Robert Gilbert (Octavius), Pulitzer winner Stephen Adly Guirgis (Cinna the Poet), Gregg Henry (Caesar), Edward James Hyland (Lepidus/Popilius), Tony winner Nikki M. James (Portia), Christopher Livingston (Titinis/Cinna), Elizabeth Marvel (Antony), Chris Myers (Flavius/Messala/Ligarius), Stoll (Marcus Brutus), Thompson (Caius Cassius) and Natalie Woolams-Torres (Marullus).Julius Caesar will feature scenic design by David Rockwell, costume design by Paul Tazewell, lighting design by Kenneth Posner, sound design by Jessica Paz and original music and soundscapes by Bray Poor.A Midsummer Night’s Dream will include Tony winner Ashford (Helena), Tony nominee De’Adre Aziza (Hippolyta), Kyle Beltran (Lysander), Tony nominee Burstein (Nick Bottom), Tony nominee Shalita Grant (Hermia), Alex Hernandez (Demetrius), Jeff Hiller (Francis Flute), Robert Joy (Peter Quince), David Manis (Egeus/Fairy), Patrena Murray (Tom Snout), Tony nominee Kristine Nielsen (Puck) and Joe Tapper (Robin Starveling).A Midsummer Night’s Dream will feature scenic design by David Rockwell, costume design by Clint Ramos, lighting design by Tyler Micoleau, sound design by Jessica Paz, original music by Justin Levine and choreography by Danny Mefford.Additional casting will be announced at a later date.Tickets to the Public Theater’s Free Shakespeare in the Park are distributed, two per person, at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park on the day of the show. Annaleigh Ashford(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) View Commentslast_img read more