InterUrban ArtHouse acquires Overland Park Post Office building across the street to provide space for expansion

first_imgRendering of the new gallery space planned for the InterUrban Arthouse.The InterUrban ArtHouse, a cultural anchor in downtown Overland Park for five years, has bought the post office building across the street to allow a major expansion of its arts programs and studio space.Angie Hejduk, chief operating officer for the ArtHouse, said the acquisition of the 10,000 square-foot post office building at 8010 Conser St. was completed with the help of a $160,000 grant from the City of Overland Park.Other funding for the purchase: Anonymous, $100,000; Regnier Foundation, $75,000; Howard Jacobson, $20,000; Hal Shapiro, $10,000, and Sunderland Foundation, $100,000.Plans call for the U.S. Post Office to downsize its current operation and continue to operate a 1,000 square-foot retail facility in the building.Rendering of the community porch planned for the new InterUrban Arthouse.The remainder will be converted to a dozen studios, classroom and exhibition space, and a coffee shop. The loading dock will become a “community porch.” The move also will allow InterUrban to meet the needs of people with disabilities.Hejduk estimated the cost of the renovation at about $500,000. A fundraising effort is underway. The InterUrban ArtHouse purchased the post office building debt-free and wants to complete the renovations without debt as well. The organization currently is in rented space across the street at 8001 Conser.Owning its own space and avoiding the uncertainty of rent increases was one of the goals when Nicole Emanuel founded the ArtHouse. “She came to Kansas City with her family and found that there were only a few artist spaces in this area,” Hejduk said. “She reached out to the community and over 100 artists showed up…by owning the building, we can control our rent.”Hejduk said the InterUrban ArtHouse has been a contributor to the renaissance currently occurring in downtown Overland Park. The retail district is thriving and developments totaling more than 500 apartments are in the pipeline.“We’ve been here for several years and feel we’ve been a key component of the cultural landscape,” she said. “That’s why people are developing and creating more living options.”Hejduk also praised the City of Overland Park for its help acquiring the post office building.“The city made a substantial endorsement of arts programming in this community,” she said.The ArtHouse will continue utilizing its former rented space at 8001 Conser. A new middle school for the arts is in the works there as well, and students at the school are expected to take classes at InterUrban ArtHouse.The first event planned for the new space will be a TEDxOverland Park grand opening on the theme of Systems. It will be March 2, 2017 at 2 p.m.The InterUrban ArtHouse has acquired the post office building at 8010 Conser St. in downtown Overland Park.last_img read more

Overland Park residents make case for non-discrimination ordinance, though legal staff raise questions about enforceability

first_imgMore than 50 people Wednesday presented heartfelt pleas to Overland Park leaders to approve an ordinance with legal protections from discrimination for the LGBTQ+ community, despite a grim assessment from the city’s legal department about its enforceability.The crowd at the council’s community development committee discussion was largely in favor of passage of a non-discrimination ordinance, saying Overland Park should do what nine other Johnson County municipalities have already done.Committee chair Curt Skoog invited the public to discuss the issue as the city decides how to move forward. In February, the council passed a resolution in support of LGBTQ+ rights, but left it to state legislators to write a law granting legal protection. Since that has not happened, the council is revisiting the issue.Several speakers last night told the committee Overland Park should step forward because the statehouse leadership is unlikely to make the necessary changes, and there have been issues in the area. One speaker told the committee she had experienced discrimination based on gender identity.“I’ve been a victim of anti transgender discrimination right here in Overland Park,” said Una Nowling, an intersex and transgender woman who is president of the KKFI 90.1 board of directors. “I’ve been thrown out of a business, I’ve been refused service, I’ve had hate speech used against me by staff and local business…Yes it is happening and no we can’t delay on this.”Numerous speakers asked the city to adopt an ordinance, saying it’s the right thing to do and it would send a message to lawmakers.“This is a local issue. Throwing up your hands and saying that this is something that can only be done at the state or federal level does not absolve you from responsibility,” said Taryn Jones. File photo from city council candidate forum.“This is a local issue. Throwing up your hands and saying that this is something that can only be done at the state or federal level does not absolve you from responsibility,” said Taryn Jones, a gay woman who was among the candidates in the primary field for a Ward 1 seat on the city council.State Rep. Jared Ousley, one of several legislators who attended the meeting, said having cities pass ordinances would help the argument at the state level.However, Overland Park legal staff told the committee they had concerns about the enforceability of such city level measures. The Kansas Preservation of Religious Freedom Act severely limits enforcement of non-discrimination laws if a person cites religious beliefs, said Michael Koss, senior assistant city attorney. The city’s legal staff has asked for an attorney general’s opinion on how to enforce such ordinances.Some of the speakers pushed back on that point, saying that a city ordinance has at least some chance at being enforced, while the resolution already on the books remains just a resolution.Other speakers invoked the goals of Forward OP that stressed making the city a welcoming place for all people. “It is impossible to feel welcome in a place where you can be denied housing because of who you love,” said Melissa Cheatham. “Quite frankly I think that having to endure hours of public debate about whether or not you are entitled to full human and civil rights probably doesn’t feel very welcoming.”Still others said the lack of ongoing legal protection would cost Overland Park talented young workers who want to live in a diverse place.Beatrice Turley, a sophomore at Shawnee Mission West, said she wants to live in a place where the law protects her. “A non-discrimination ordinance is a very simple way to invite people different from you and make Overland Park an even better community to be a part of.”Hope Fritton, a sophomore at Shawnee Mission South, said, “This ordinance is our opportunity to be neighbors and to make our city a place that is a little (more) free of hate.”Jacob Moyer, a student at Johnson County Community College, remembered asking his high school teacher at Shawnee Mission North about the safety pin she was wearing. She told him it was because she was a safe person to talk to if he was bullied or had other issues, he said. Then one day, she told him she couldn’t wear it anymore because she’d risk being fired.“She’s not even gay but she could still be fired for supporting LGBTQ rights, which tells you that this is an important ordinance to pass,” Moyer said.Only four people spoke against the ordinance. Some said they didn’t want to rush into a law that would be complex and difficult to enforce.“The definitions of sexual orientation and gender identity are so spread out and so different and so rapidly changing that just from a bystander’s perspective how in the world is someone supposed to keep up with that,” said Kathy Laverick. She also said she thought normalizing transgender issues would be detrimental to children.Patricia Brown was concerned that the city continues to respect the rights of those with religious convictions. “I’m concerned that an ordinance that would promote the rights of one would then violate the rights of the other,” she said.The discussion lasted about two and a half hours. Skoog said he will discuss with Mayor Carl Gerlach how to proceed.last_img read more

What Is Los Alamos Youth Earth Team All About?

first_imgIn this article, you learn about who we are, what we do and more. We have many goals in mind for the future and we hope to be able to complete a few this year. LAPS News: We have done many things already to help the environment, but with not a lot of funding, there’s not much we can do. We are just a group of kids who wants to help the environment. That is why we would like you to help us! Our goals are to make the environment cleaner, for instance, we are: We are planning on making the court at the middle school more eco-friendly by planting grass, trees, and possibly a pond. We also went to the Valles Caldera, to test the water. Watershed monitoring is important because it makes sure that water quality, fauna, chemical balance, and volume is sufficient for our wildlife. We have also gone to things like a recycling fair where they teach about recycling. We have planned many things but without your help, we can not do it. We do not know when you will see us again, but currently, we are focusing on having the whole club working towards a common goal. We are very serious about getting work done and helping the beautiful New Mexican outdoors. You can help in many ways, here are some examples: Anyone can spread the word about the right way to recycle and what you can recycle. If you’re interested in donating to our fundraising website, we are always in need of funding for these projects, you can donate at https://www.gofundme.com/f/los-alamos-youth-earth-team-fundraiser. Anyone can also help in their community and do things like pick up trash. You can help the environment if you do simple things. You might say “What is the Los Alamos Youth Earth Team?” … we are a middle school group that helps the environment and does projects that help the plants and animals around us. last_img read more