Easton Introduces More Road Tubeless, Better Hubs; EC90 Aero 55 – The Single Wheelset…

first_imgWhen new wheels were spotted under triathlete Andreas Raelert at Ironman Austria, the lack of hiding them suggested an imminent release. Well, here they are, along with a whole lot more. Not only have the 55mm EC90 Aero wheels been completely redesigned, the road line up gets a boost with new hubs, tubeless compatibility, wide rims, and more freehub selections!Ratchet past the break for more details… While most of the new developments are wrapped up in the all new EC90 Aero 55, other wheels in the line up benefit from the technology trickling down. Called the Single Wheelset Arsenal, the new Aero 55 seems to have all the bases covered – they’re light, aero, clincher, tubular, and tubeless, and have much improved hubs.A big part of the new design is the Fantom rim – a much wider rim that improved drastically over the previous shape which is now found on all EC90 wheels. Now 21mm wide, and 19mm internally, the rim is 6mm wider than the previous EC90 Aero 56, while 1mm shallower.At least according to Easton’s data, the Fantom is radically better than the 2012 Ec90 Aero, while also appearing to be quite a bit better at yaw angles of 12.5 degrees than the competitors. Due to the blunt nose of the Fantom rim, it is also more stable in cross winds – something that becomes more important the more aero you go. The result is a more rideable, aerodynamic wheel for all conditions.In addition to tubular rims, the Aero 55 will be offered in a tubeless clincher version as well. Using Easton’s Eyelet Nipple system, the nipples thread into the eyelets allowing for a sealed rim bed, therefore tubeless. Certified for Road Tubeless even without sealant, the Aero 55 is one of the first carbon tubeless road wheels on the market.Along with the rim, big changes have been made to the hubs as well with the introduction of the all new Echo system. While the performance of the previous R4 system wasn’t exactly stellar, the Echo looks to address all of the previous issues with an intriguing design and a host of improvements. The biggest of which would be the positioning of the bearings which resulted in an all new freehub design.On the R4 hubs, the load bearings were located in the center of the hub far from the dropout which created a lot of leverage on them which is bad for bearing life. The Echo system places the load bearings as far apart as possible which should drastically improve bearing life. This design required a new freehub though, so Easton rethought the design and the pawls now reside in the hub body instead of the freehub body. Taking things a step further, the two center bearings are now angular contact bearings as well, further increasing durability. All of the new road wheels are compatible with Campy, Shimano, and Sram 9/10/11.Part of the cassette body redesign resulted in the engagement increasing from 12 to 7° for improved efficiency especially out of corners. Since the straight pull spoke flanges are separated from the bearing bores, bearing performance can be kept consistent regardless of spoke tension. The hubs also include an improved QR skewer with an internal cam mechanism. If you haven’t caught on, the focus for the new wheels across the line is durability, decreased maintenance, and improved power transfer.EC90 Aero 55 wheels will be available this fall for $2,400 for the 1330g tubular set and $2,800 for the 1580g tubeless clincher.As mentioned, Echo and Tubeless Road technology also makes their way into the aluminum wheel line like the new EA90 SLX. At 1400g, the tubeless road wheelset looks good with a 22mm external width and 17.5mm internal. Built with the same Echo hubset as the Aero 55s (also found on all other EA90 and EC90 wheels), the EA90 SLX feature 16/20 ft/rr spoking with double butted straight pull spokes. EA90 SLX wheels will retail for $1200.Currently Echo hubsets and tubeless rims can be found on the EC90 Aero 55 clincher and tubular, and EA90 SLX and SL wheelsets, with another tubeless option in the EA90 XD cross wheelset. Wider rims are found across the board, all the way down to the new 22mm wide EA70 and EA70 SL wheels. For more information check out Easton Cycling.last_img read more

Drawbridge demolition set to begin

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The drawbridge in North Hero is set to be demolished beginning this week. Testing in July by the Agency of Transportation yielded positive results for some lead as well as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which delayed the demolition process.Meanwhile, the temporary bridge on Route 2 is open to two lanes of traffic. Expect intermittent stops and releases of traffic by flaggers to allow for construction vehicles to enter the work zone. The contractor is working 7AM to 6PM, Monday through Thursday, and 7AM to 1PM on Friday.The temporary bridge has a speed limit of 25mph. There are tight curves approaching the temporary bridge, and trucks are advised to reduce speed to 15mph. Bicycles should use caution while crossing the bridge. The work zone speed limit is enforced, and individuals have been ticketed for excessive speeding. Obeying the speed limit is extremely important for everyone’s safety.NOTICE TO MARINERS: The temporary drawbridge is opening on the top of the hour between 8 AM and 8 PM, 7 days per week, until October 15, 2019. An update for this boating season includes a reduction in channel width to 40 feet at the drawbridge location.The existing bridge is left in the open position. Mariners can request drawbridge openings by the bridge tender on Channel 13 or at 802-372-4360. The bridge will not open unless a request is made.Smaller vessels are reminded to be aware of the Coast Guard Safety Zone. It is important not to linger within this zone for your own safety. CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES:   Onsite subsurface investigations to classify and profile the soil is complete. The contractor plans to resume demolition activities the week of October 7th. Night work is planned for October 10th.Source: VTrans 10.4.2019last_img read more

Overland Park residents make case for non-discrimination ordinance, though legal staff raise questions about enforceability

first_imgMore than 50 people Wednesday presented heartfelt pleas to Overland Park leaders to approve an ordinance with legal protections from discrimination for the LGBTQ+ community, despite a grim assessment from the city’s legal department about its enforceability.The crowd at the council’s community development committee discussion was largely in favor of passage of a non-discrimination ordinance, saying Overland Park should do what nine other Johnson County municipalities have already done.Committee chair Curt Skoog invited the public to discuss the issue as the city decides how to move forward. In February, the council passed a resolution in support of LGBTQ+ rights, but left it to state legislators to write a law granting legal protection. Since that has not happened, the council is revisiting the issue.Several speakers last night told the committee Overland Park should step forward because the statehouse leadership is unlikely to make the necessary changes, and there have been issues in the area. One speaker told the committee she had experienced discrimination based on gender identity.“I’ve been a victim of anti transgender discrimination right here in Overland Park,” said Una Nowling, an intersex and transgender woman who is president of the KKFI 90.1 board of directors. “I’ve been thrown out of a business, I’ve been refused service, I’ve had hate speech used against me by staff and local business…Yes it is happening and no we can’t delay on this.”Numerous speakers asked the city to adopt an ordinance, saying it’s the right thing to do and it would send a message to lawmakers.“This is a local issue. Throwing up your hands and saying that this is something that can only be done at the state or federal level does not absolve you from responsibility,” said Taryn Jones. File photo from city council candidate forum.“This is a local issue. Throwing up your hands and saying that this is something that can only be done at the state or federal level does not absolve you from responsibility,” said Taryn Jones, a gay woman who was among the candidates in the primary field for a Ward 1 seat on the city council.State Rep. Jared Ousley, one of several legislators who attended the meeting, said having cities pass ordinances would help the argument at the state level.However, Overland Park legal staff told the committee they had concerns about the enforceability of such city level measures. The Kansas Preservation of Religious Freedom Act severely limits enforcement of non-discrimination laws if a person cites religious beliefs, said Michael Koss, senior assistant city attorney. The city’s legal staff has asked for an attorney general’s opinion on how to enforce such ordinances.Some of the speakers pushed back on that point, saying that a city ordinance has at least some chance at being enforced, while the resolution already on the books remains just a resolution.Other speakers invoked the goals of Forward OP that stressed making the city a welcoming place for all people. “It is impossible to feel welcome in a place where you can be denied housing because of who you love,” said Melissa Cheatham. “Quite frankly I think that having to endure hours of public debate about whether or not you are entitled to full human and civil rights probably doesn’t feel very welcoming.”Still others said the lack of ongoing legal protection would cost Overland Park talented young workers who want to live in a diverse place.Beatrice Turley, a sophomore at Shawnee Mission West, said she wants to live in a place where the law protects her. “A non-discrimination ordinance is a very simple way to invite people different from you and make Overland Park an even better community to be a part of.”Hope Fritton, a sophomore at Shawnee Mission South, said, “This ordinance is our opportunity to be neighbors and to make our city a place that is a little (more) free of hate.”Jacob Moyer, a student at Johnson County Community College, remembered asking his high school teacher at Shawnee Mission North about the safety pin she was wearing. She told him it was because she was a safe person to talk to if he was bullied or had other issues, he said. Then one day, she told him she couldn’t wear it anymore because she’d risk being fired.“She’s not even gay but she could still be fired for supporting LGBTQ rights, which tells you that this is an important ordinance to pass,” Moyer said.Only four people spoke against the ordinance. Some said they didn’t want to rush into a law that would be complex and difficult to enforce.“The definitions of sexual orientation and gender identity are so spread out and so different and so rapidly changing that just from a bystander’s perspective how in the world is someone supposed to keep up with that,” said Kathy Laverick. She also said she thought normalizing transgender issues would be detrimental to children.Patricia Brown was concerned that the city continues to respect the rights of those with religious convictions. “I’m concerned that an ordinance that would promote the rights of one would then violate the rights of the other,” she said.The discussion lasted about two and a half hours. Skoog said he will discuss with Mayor Carl Gerlach how to proceed.last_img read more