Blair offers Africa pain relief from debt and ‘unfair’ trade

first_imgDave Timms from the World Development Movement said that the report may contain little fresh thinking. He noted that a previous commission chaired by late German chancellor Willy Brandt recommended in 1980 that all rich countries should reach the 0.7% goal by 1985 and a 1% goal by 2000. “There seems to be a ratcheting down of ambitions,” said Timms. [email protected] The British government has decided to make Africa and climate change the two principal themes of its stints heading both the EU and the Group of Eight (G8) industrialised countries this year. As part of those efforts, Blair is to announce the findings of the 17-member Commission for Africa, which he chaired. The report urges rich countries to:l Rally behind a British proposal for an ‘international finance facility’, under which aid pledges would be used as collateral for bonds on the capital markets, with the resulting money used to double development assistance; l increase funding for health systems in Africa by €7.5 billion next year and provide the €2.4bn for work planned by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria;l immediately scrap all “trade-distorting” subsidies for cotton and sugar, as these endanger the livelihoods of small African growers; and,l finance the cancellation of all debts owed to multilateral bodies like the World Bank, diverting the savings into health and education.The report describes corruption as a “systemic problem affecting many African countries”. Civil wars are recognised as a barrier to progress too, with donors called on to provide half the budget – €150 million in 2004-07 – of the African Union’s peacekeeping fund.A source involved in the Commission for Africa said it was trying to find common ground between those who believed greater assistance should go to conflict prevention and resolution in Africa and those who felt the bulk of aid should be for health and education. “Unless we address conflict and security issues we will not get very far,” the source added. “But we also have to address the root cause of conflict – the lack of economic growth and lack of development.”The report is to argue that rich countries meet the target set by the UN in 1970 to devote at least 0.7% of their gross domestic production to development aid. So far Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands and Luxembourg are the only EU states to have exceeded that goal.last_img read more

People Moves: GVA, Ingleton Wood, CBRE and more

first_imgFull screen in popup Carter Jonas has hired Julia Wilson as an associate partner in its residential sales team in Oxford. Oliver Sherriff has joined CBRE as a surveyor in its agency team in Southampton. Previous GVA has appointed Jonathan Davies as associate director in its Cardiff valuation team. In addition, Hayley McCarthy and Jodie Al-Khafaji join as graduate surveyors in the building consultancy team and agency team respectively.Jacqui Fishwick has joined APAM as property manager in its Manchester office. She has more than 10 years’ experience, most recently as portfolio manager at Assura.Carter Jonas has hired Julia Wilson as an associate partner in its residential sales team in Oxford. She moves from Penny & Sinclair, where she was an associate.Tim Grierson has been recruited by Delva Patman Redler as head of dilapidations in its London team. He joins from Cushman & Wakefield.MDA Consulting has welcomed Lee Gurney as an associate director.CBRE Manchester has recruited five graduates: Megan Hanney joins the office agency team; Dan Margolis joins commercial valuation; James Berry joins the industrial agency team; Jennifer Craig joins building consultancy; and Francis Hill joins the planning and development team.Anne Baker has moved to Lambert Smith Hampton’s property management team. She was formerly a partner at King Sturge.Ingleton Wood has appointed Memo Ngwenya as a quantity surveyor in its London office.Guy Horswell has been made land and planning assistant at Strategic Land Group.Savills venture Workthere has hired Ed Bouterse as its head in the Netherlands. Previously, he worked at Regus.Oliver Sherriff has joined CBRE as a surveyor in its agency team in Southampton. He previously worked for Portsmouth City Council.Avison Young has made a series of promotions and appointments: James Goode, Harry Skinner and Mark Cooke are promoted to associate director; Scott Meakin joins as a graduate surveyor; Glenn Taylor joins as a surveyor; and Emma Dutton joins as an administrator.Jordan Clarke has moved to Trident Building Consultancy as an assistant building surveyor in its Birmingham office.The Howard de Walden Estate has appointed Jenny Casebourne and Andrea Merrington to its management team. Casebourne recently joined the estate as head of retail and restaurants. Merrington has been with the estate for nine years and leads its planning team.George Craig has been hired by Savills as an associate director in its development team in Norwich. Previously, he worked at Targetfollow in Norwich. Before that he spent nine years in London as a consultant. In addition, Jonathan Prince joins as associate director in the development team in Reading. He has more than 10 years’ experience and previously worked at JLL. Savills venture Workthere has hired Ed Bouterse as its head in the Netherlands. GVA has appointed Jonathan Davies as associate director in its Cardiff valuation team.center_img Anne Baker has moved to Lambert Smith Hampton’s property management team. George Craig has been hired by Savills as an associate director in its development team in Norwich. 1/7 show caption Next Jordan Clarke has moved to Trident Building Consultancy as an assistant building surveyor in its Birmingham office.last_img read more

GFA to resume work on Monday

first_imgBusiness will resume at the headquarters of the Ghana Football Association on Monday after the dramatic events of this week stalled work.The offices of the GFA were raided on Tuesday by officers from the Economic and Organised Crime Office as part of their investigations into what they say is suspected crime at the Football Association.The central processing units of key departments at the GFA were taken away, as were documents from the Football Association.The GFA has now headed to court over the raid, challenging the powers of the Economic and Organised Crime Office to investigate it.But work will resume at the GFA on Monday as officials battle to stem a development many worry has dire consequences for Ghana football.Source: Kickoff.comlast_img