AT&T offloads Caribbean assets

first_img US chip funding tipped to top $150B Related Amazon reels in MGM Author AT&T Tags Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more AT&T revealed plans to sell its mobile and fixed assets in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands to broadband provider Liberty Latin America for nearly $2 billion, as it continues to shed outlying businesses to cut debt.The $1.95 billion deal includes the handover of AT&T’s network assets; spectrum; real estate and related leases; contracts; and customers, including 1.1 million mobile subscribers.Some 1,300 AT&T employees will also transfer to Liberty Latin America once the transaction is finalised.Liberty Latin America CEO Balan Nair said in a statement the addition of AT&T’s assets to its own broadband and TV portfolio “will create a strong and competitive integrated communications player”.AT&T noted the deal will not affect its commitment to build a dedicated network for emergency responders (known as FirstNet) in either location.Closing is subject to review by both the US Federal Communications Commission and Department of Justice, but is expected within nine months.John Stephens, AT&T CFO, noted the transaction stemmed from the operator’s “ongoing strategic review of our balance sheet and assets,” which aims to identify opportunities to raise funds to pay down billions in debt.Earlier this year, the operator sold its stake in Hulu along with property in New York City. Executives also revealed plans to sell tower assets in the US and Mexico.Including the Liberty Latin America deal, AT&T said it had completed or announced sales totalling more than $11 billion. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Home AT&T offloads Caribbean assets Diana Goovaerts AT&T pushes cybersecurity to public sector Previous ArticleRealme continues EU push with X2Next ArticleUS operators come back for more mmWave AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 09 OCT 2019 last_img read more

South Korea’s S.H. Park races to LPGA lead

first_imgROGERS, Ark. – Sung Hyun Park has said one of her goals this season is to win the LPGA Rookie of the Year award. The South Korean might add the title of ”winner” to her resume well before any season-ending awards, particularly after opening the NW Arkansas Championship with an 8-under 63 on Friday. Park finished with nine birdies on her way to nearly matching the course record of 62, needing only 24 putts to take a two-shot lead over Mel Reid, Ally McDonald and So Yeon Ryu. ”My play was best with the putter today, very good,” Park said. Reid also reached as low as 8 under midway through her round, making a hole-in-one on the par-3 11th. She used a 9-iron on the 135-yard hole, hitting it just past the flag before it spun back and rolled into the hole. ”As soon as I hit it, I thought, ‘Oh, it’s got a chance,”’ Reid said. Local favorite Stacy Lewis and 56-year-old Juli Inkster were at 66 along with Felicity Johnson, Moriya Jutanugarn and Katherine Kirk. Defending champion and second-ranked Lydia Ko opened with a 70 The 34-year-old Park won seven times and was the top earner last year on the Korean LPGA tour, but she also played in seven LPGA events with an eye on making the move to the U.S. She has finished in the top 10 four times this year, nine times in her 19 total LPGA appearances. All that is lacking to solidify her rapid rise into the ranks of the LPGA’s elite is a victory, possibly this weekend in advance of next week’s KPMG Women’s PGA Championship. ”I wasn’t really surprised to see how well (Park) is (playing),” fellow South Korean Ryu said. ”Even last year, she played a few LPGA tournaments as a non-member, but she would finish top-five, top-10. I think she is a really great golfer, and it’s a matter of how comfortable she is on the tour.” Park played in the humid and overcast conditions during the morning at Pinnacle Country Club, avoiding a 46-minute weather delay and gusty conditions during the afternoon. She entered the tournament fourth in the LPGA in driving distance, and she lived up to that Friday, booming 290-yard drives on the 7,001-yard course. Ryu was the only player in the afternoon to come within two shots of Park’s morning round, capping her round by reaching the par-5 18th in two and two-putting for her sixth birdie and a bogey-free round. ”I had two weeks off and was really fresh to play,” Ryu said. ”I think was everything was really smooth from start to end, and it feels really great to be back.” Former world No. 1 Ai Miyazato shot a 72 in her first round in the U.S. after announcing last month that she plans to retire at the end of the season. Michelle Wie opened with a 68.last_img read more

Commission calls for review of hate crime

first_imgCrimes committed against victims due to their disability, sexual orientation or transgender identity could be punished more harshly, the Law Commission has suggested in a call for a comprehensive review of ‘hate crime’.A report published today recommends reforms to ensure the criminal justice system is able to make a ‘stronger and more coherent’ response to hate crime. For policing purposes, a crime is recorded as a hate crime if the victim or anyone else believes it to have been motivated by hostility based on disability, gender identity, race, religion and sexual orientation. But criminal offences available do not cover all five characteristics.The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 created racially and religiously aggravated offence and the Public Order Act 1986 criminalises various forms of stirring up hatred on the grounds of race, religion and sexual orientation.The commission said responses to a consultation showed strong support for extending the aggravated offences, but many responses also indicated that existing offences are ‘unnecessarily complex and not working well’. The commission recommends a ‘comprehensive review’ considering how the criminal justice system should best protect victims of hate crime, which characteristics should be protected by specific criminal offences, how such characteristics should be identified and the role played by sentencing.The commission notes that such a review would require government support and resources. If that was lacking, it suggested the ‘alternative but less satisfactory solution’ that the aggravated offences should be extended to disability, sexual orientation and transgender identity.Its research found that enhanced sentencing powers are being under-used, in part because the hostility element of hate crime is often not investigated fully and the court is not given the evidence needed to enhance sentencing.It recommends that the Sentencing Council provide clear guidance to judges on sentencing for any crime with an element of hostility, and that the Police National Computer record where any offence was aggravated by hostility.However creating new offences of stirring up hatred on the grounds of disability and transgender identity would bring very few successful prosecutions, the commission said. Law commissioner for criminal law Professor David Ormerod QC said: ‘We do not believe that simply extending the existing offences would provide an adequate solution. Instead, we recommend a thorough review of the scheme should be carried out. We believe this would provide the criminal justice system with its best opportunity to respond effectively to hate crime in all its forms.’Commenting, justice minister Damian Green (pictured) said: ‘All forms of hate crime are despicable and can have devastating consequences for victims and communities.’

He said the government welcomes the report and will be considering the recommendations before responding ‘in due course’.last_img read more

Column: Phelps stops Olympic clock for us all

first_imgAs we age, Olympians just seem to get younger. First, they seed the gardens of our childhood imaginations, giving us an idea of who we want to be when we grow up. In our twenties, they are more like us, at the height of our powers, only with superpowers. In our thirties, they are what we would like to think we could be again if we shed pounds and unwrap those unused running shoes. But by middle age and beyond, their youth becomes insolent and their taut vigor becomes a mirror for what we’ve lost forever: You cannot take your eyes off them but looking hurts more than a little, too.Pass the cachaça, with a double dose of Prozac.Even Phelps seemed to feel morbidity’s cold claw after his last Olympic race, saying at his last post-victory Olympic news conference that his baby son, Boomer, will likely inherit his 28 medals, 23 of them gold, when he dies.Phelps sank into his chair with the audible sigh of an old lion for his final Q-and-A.“It’s nice to sit down,” he said, wearing all of his 31 years.Welcome to the club, Michael. Here, try the slippers, take the remote.The younger generations reading this won’t yet fully understand how the retirement of an Olympian whose ups, many ups, and downs you have followed for such a large slice of life, through five Olympics, feels like the onset of grey hair, the wrong side of a watershed.At best, how many Summer Olympics do any of us get to witness? Fifteen, perhaps, 20 if we’re lucky? For 25 percent of that journey, Phelps has swum at our side, reassuringly constant, plying us with thrill upon thrill.By holding creeping years at bay for his last Olympic week, fueled by a love rekindled for swimming that he’d lost ahead of the 2012 London Games, Phelps kept his eyes fixed on the here and now, on his next exploit and his late bloom into a more mature, thoughtful, and engaging version of the one-dimensional medal machine he used to be. By un-retiring for Rio, Phelps enabled us to pretend that this wasn’t quite the end until, of course, it was.Now, we can only look back at what used to be. Being beaten by 21-year-old Joseph Schooling in the 100-meter butterfly and swimming his last gold-medal winning relay with Ryan Murphy, the 21-year-old who broke the world record for the first 100-meter leg of backstroke, were telltale signs that Phelps’ time is up. Both Schooling and Murphy have old souvenir photos they took with Phelps when they were youngsters and he was an upcoming Olympic idol. Now is their time to become idols to others.If these are the games of big-names retirements, headlined by the farewells of Phelps and Bolt, then logic dictates that the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 must be the games of renewal. New, as yet unknown stars will be born; there should be more medals to look forward to from Katie Ledecky, already the owner of five swimming golds at just 19, and others now carving out their place in Rio.But there will always be a void where Phelps and Bolt once lived so large.___John Leicester is an international sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at [email protected] or follow him at http://twitter.com/johnleicester . See his work at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/john-leicester As we age, Olympians just seem to get younger. RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Got a bad case of lingering PMPD — Post-Michael Phelps Depression? If you think his retirement from Olympic swimming is a bitter pill, then batten down the hatches for the imminent global epidemic of Life’s Hardly Worth Living Without Usain Bolt when he schmoozes out in a samba of sad emotion this week.Storms of Mo Farah Misery also are forecast. Having retained his 10,000-meter title at the Rio Games, the British runner only needs a repeat in the 5,000 on Saturday to give him a gold medal for each of his four children and a good excuse to close the curtain on the Olympics at age 33.Bradley Wiggins has ridden off into the Rio de Janeiro sunset, having become the only Brit with eight Olympic medals, all in cycling and from five games. The tick-tock of the Olympic clock would also suggest that these were likely the final games for 30-year-old Rafael Nadal, 34-year-old Serena Williams and the 2008 and 2012 Olympic women’s 100-meter champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, finally overtaken at age 29 by another Jamaican five years her junior, Elaine Thompson. Evergreen gymnast Oksana Chusovitina is a notable exception, already eyeing what she hopes will be her eighth Olympics in 2020, when she will be, wait for it, 45.When, eventually, they all join Phelps in retirement, they’ll be sorely missed. If sports teams are like a marriage, with us our whole lives, Olympians are brief but exciting recurring romances. By wowing and wooing for two weeks every four years, they can sink deeper hooks into hearts than footballers, baseball players and others who, by populating lives and screens 24/7, become part of the furniture. To twist the lyrics from the “Girl from Ipanema,” when Olympians pass by, all tall and tan and young and lovely, the rest of us can only go “aah.”center_img United States’ Michael Phelps celebrates with teammates during the medal ceremony for the men’s 4 x 100-meter medley relay final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP) First, they seed the gardens of our childhood imaginations, giving us an idea of who we want to be when we grow up. In our twenties, they are more like us, at the height of our powers, only with superpowers. In our thirties, they are what we would like to think we could be again if we shed pounds and unwrap those unused running shoes. But by middle age and beyond, their youth becomes insolent and their taut vigor becomes a mirror for what we’ve lost forever: You cannot take your eyes off them but looking hurts more than a little, too.Pass the cachaça, with a double dose of Prozac.Even Phelps seemed to feel morbidity’s cold claw after his last Olympic race, saying at his last post-victory Olympic news conference that his baby son, Boomer, will likely inherit his 28 medals, 23 of them gold, when he dies.Phelps sank into his chair with the audible sigh of an old lion for his final Q-and-A.“It’s nice to sit down,” he said, wearing all of his 31 years.Welcome to the club, Michael. Here, try the slippers, take the remote.The younger generations reading this won’t yet fully understand how the retirement of an Olympian whose ups, many ups, and downs you have followed for such a large slice of life, through five Olympics, feels like the onset of grey hair, the wrong side of a watershed.At best, how many Summer Olympics do any of us get to witness? Fifteen, perhaps, 20 if we’re lucky? For 25 percent of that journey, Phelps has swum at our side, reassuringly constant, plying us with thrill upon thrill.By holding creeping years at bay for his last Olympic week, fueled by a love rekindled for swimming that he’d lost ahead of the 2012 London Games, Phelps kept his eyes fixed on the here and now, on his next exploit and his late bloom into a more mature, thoughtful, and engaging version of the one-dimensional medal machine he used to be. By un-retiring for Rio, Phelps enabled us to pretend that this wasn’t quite the end until, of course, it was.Now, we can only look back at what used to be. Being beaten by 21-year-old Joseph Schooling in the 100-meter butterfly and swimming his last gold-medal winning relay with Ryan Murphy, the 21-year-old who broke the world record for the first 100-meter leg of backstroke, were telltale signs that Phelps’ time is up. Both Schooling and Murphy have old souvenir photos they took with Phelps when they were youngsters and he was an upcoming Olympic idol. Now is their time to become idols to others.If these are the games of big-names retirements, headlined by the farewells of Phelps and Bolt, then logic dictates that the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 must be the games of renewal. New, as yet unknown stars will be born; there should be more medals to look forward to from Katie Ledecky, already the owner of five swimming golds at just 19, and others now carving out their place in Rio.But there will always be a void where Phelps and Bolt once lived so large.___John Leicester is an international sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at [email protected] or follow him at http://twitter.com/johnleicester . See his work at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/john-leicester,RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Got a bad case of lingering PMPD — Post-Michael Phelps Depression? If you think his retirement from Olympic swimming is a bitter pill, then batten down the hatches for the imminent global epidemic of Life’s Hardly Worth Living Without Usain Bolt when he schmoozes out in a samba of sad emotion this week.Storms of Mo Farah Misery also are forecast. Having retained his 10,000-meter title at the Rio Games, the British runner only needs a repeat in the 5,000 on Saturday to give him a gold medal for each of his four children and a good excuse to close the curtain on the Olympics at age 33.Bradley Wiggins has ridden off into the Rio de Janeiro sunset, having become the only Brit with eight Olympic medals, all in cycling and from five games. The tick-tock of the Olympic clock would also suggest that these were likely the final games for 30-year-old Rafael Nadal, 34-year-old Serena Williams and the 2008 and 2012 Olympic women’s 100-meter champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, finally overtaken at age 29 by another Jamaican five years her junior, Elaine Thompson. Evergreen gymnast Oksana Chusovitina is a notable exception, already eyeing what she hopes will be her eighth Olympics in 2020, when she will be, wait for it, 45.When, eventually, they all join Phelps in retirement, they’ll be sorely missed. If sports teams are like a marriage, with us our whole lives, Olympians are brief but exciting recurring romances. By wowing and wooing for two weeks every four years, they can sink deeper hooks into hearts than footballers, baseball players and others who, by populating lives and screens 24/7, become part of the furniture. To twist the lyrics from the “Girl from Ipanema,” when Olympians pass by, all tall and tan and young and lovely, the rest of us can only go “aah.”last_img read more

Andy Blackwell – A man of many sports—but a Hall-of-Famer in baseball

first_imgPittsburgh native Andy Blackwell—a man who, at first, was known as the “only Black guy on the team”—turned out to be the best guy on the team, and a Hall-of-Famer.Gone are the days when 20 percent of the Major Leagues were filled with Black baseball players. And nowadays, it’s hard to find a baseball team of any level that’s even 10 percent Black.But the baseball bug bit Blackwell as a kid, and it took him to his highest levels in the world of athletics.“I found that I had the most success as a child in baseball,” Blackwell told the New Pittsburgh Courier in an exclusive interview. “Baseball was bigger in Black communities back then.”Blackwell played in the late 1980s and early 1990s for in the Uptown Little League, winning championships in tournaments held in Brookline. “I had a lot of fun, winning, playing as a child in baseball.”Blackwell remembers having a parade through the middle of the old Martin Luther King Jr. Field in the Hill District. It was there that he played for the Cardinals. “I was 8 years old…my first little league game I hit a home run, and I felt confident from there,” Blackwell recalled. “When I became 10, 11, 12 years old, teams didn’t want to pitch to me. I was just ahead, above kids at 10 years old when they were 12.”Blackwell went on to star at quarterback for Westinghouse High School, while also starring in baseball and basketball. He graduated in 1997. Blackwell then spent time playing baseball for Garrett Community College (Md.), the Canton, Ohio Crocodiles, semi-pro team North Pittsburgh, and then for St. Johns Lefty’s Saints. With the St. Johns team, Blackwell won multiple local championships, made multiple trips to the semi-pro baseball World Series and won the National Amateur Baseball Federation (semi-pro) World Series in 2013 in Battle Creek, Michigan.But Blackwell’s on-field successes didn’t come without some direct—and indirect—backlash.“When I went to play professional baseball, it was like, ‘who are you?’ I was the only Black guy on the team, I had braids in my hair, other racist stuff I had to deal with,” Blackwell said about his time with some of the teams. “They were calling me Snoop Dogg, the coach didn’t think I could play, didn’t even put me in the game for three or four months. He had no conversation for me, but one day I got in the game and went 3-for-3, and I told him I could really play.”Blackwell said he still didn’t get into the starting lineup, and he “was getting no fun out of sitting on the bench, and I knew the guys playing weren’t better than me.”Better late than never, Blackwell eventually got his chance, and the rest is history.“I was a center fielder, batted .400, and for 10 years of the league I led in runs scored and stolen bases. No hitting the ball to center field, everything was caught,” Blackwell said about his time with St. Johns, where he never experienced direct or indirect discrimination.ANDY BLACKWELL, left, was a standout quarterback for Westinghouse in the mid-1990s.Blackwell was inducted into the semi-pro baseball Hall of Fame in Evansville, Indiana in 2014. He was among the youngest players ever selected to that Hall.“It was a feeling of joy,” Blackwell told the Courier about his Hall of Fame selection. “When you play semi-pro, you feel like you’re playing for the love, and to actually get something out of it was pure joy. I made history and I was proud of myself.”When you play semi-pro ball, said Blackwell’s coach, Tom McCarthy, “you love playing baseball. It’s not the easiest commitment, but the guys who have played for us, they still continue to be highly-dedicated to playing. They are the kids that are going to be there every night, and Andy was like that. You knew he would be there.”McCarthy said Blackwell’s biggest talents were his “speed, hitting, defense…he had everything and every tool you would expect or want out of a player.”Though Blackwell retired in 2015, McCarthy told the Courier he has been in talks with Blackwell about returning to the field if an age 28-and-up league is formed.But for now, Blackwell is focused on getting today’s Black kids hip to the games they love—baseball, basketball, or football. Blackwell currently is a football coach for the Homewood Bulldogs (ages 13-14). “I think I have the skills, and I know what to teach the kids,” he said. “Teach them the proper skills and techniques and (make sure they) stick with it.“Whatever you’re into, you do it all year long, and you’ll be the best. I want to just put the excitement back into our younger kids.” PITTSBURGH’S OWN ANDY BLACKWELL was a three-sport athlete at Westinghouse High School, then became a Hall-of-Fame baseball player in the semi-pro leagues. The photos show Blackwell as a baseball player in Homewood, then as a World Series winner in the semi-pro leagues.last_img read more

Franck Ribery is practically ruled out of Bayern Munich’s match with Barcelona

first_img With these words, it seems that Pep Guardiola will be without one of his key attacking players once again when Barça visit. CEST “I was really keen to play and I’ve worked really hard to get back as soon as possible, but my ankle has not responded and it’s really frustrating,” Ribery told Kicker.  Sport EN Ribery has four days to make a miracle recovery if he wants to play in Munich, or Guardiola, once again, will have to pick a team without either the Frenchman or Dutch international Arjen Robben.  08/05/2015center_img Upd. at 19:06 The French forward has been sidelined with an ankle injury and it looks like he won’t be able to help his side as they try to overturn a 3-0 first leg defeat at Camp Nou on Wednesday night.  The two sides will resume their battle this week with a place in the Berlin final on June 6 up for grabs. It looks like a return for the second leg of Bayern Munich’s Champions League semi-final with Barcelona on Tuesday will be Mission Impossible for Franck Ribery. last_img read more

Locke Boys turn in solid effort at World Junior Ski Championships

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe Locke Boys of Nelson are at it again, this time at the World Junior Cross Country Ski Qualifiers in Thunder Bay, Ont.The pair, skiing out of the Black Jack Ski Club in Rossland, finished in the top 35 during Thursday’s Junior Make 20 kilometer Classic/Free Mass Start race at the Lappe Nordic Ski Centre.Peter Locke led the charge placing 26th overall while brother Julian was 34th.
The top four male and female finishers represent Canada at the World Junior Championships.The race was won by Andy Shields in a time of Waterloo Region Club. Peter Locke was just over five minutes behind Shields.Julian Locke finished almost seven minutes behind [email protected]last_img

Greenwood hosts second successful rugby bash

first_imgThere was only one woman’s team, which came from Ridge Meadows. The men’s teams played a few games with them and some of the woman joined the men’s teams and played along with them.“One woman player on the Grizzlies,” said Glaser, noting that she played exceptionally well. “She was fit and toned and ran hard. She ran really good lines.”The Trail Colonials were awarded the most social team and Bryan Louzon was awarded the most social player.Glaser said the games were all really good and that the level of play was strong this year. The players followed the rules and there was no kicking or fighting.Ingram Creek Saddlery donated a custom-made leather ball for the winning team again this year. Glaser said this makes them stand out from other tournaments.“It’s a really special thing,” he said.  New to the tournament this year was a kids touch game and a concession stand. They had about 100 people as spectators and everyone seemed to have a good time, said Glaser.The only real complaint was about the noise from the music at the campsite at night. Glaser said he hadn’t considered how much the noise would carry and that he would consider a noise curfew the next year.Glaser is hoping to host the event this year but says it depends on what the numbers look like after they have done their calculations. He is happy if they are just able to break even because it’s all about having fun, but if the host team has lost a lot of money they may not host it again next year. Greenwood was full of Rugby players again last weekend for the Boundary Bash Social 10s Rugby Tournament. This is the second year they have hosted this tournament and this year they were larger by just one team.Organizer and Jewel Lake resident Oliver Glaser said the tournament was a success, particularly in regards to the social aspect.Everyone had fun and the City of Greenwood opened up O’Hairi Park as a campsite for the rugby players, he said.This year’s teams included the East Vancouver Scribes, who technically hosted the event because Glaser still plays on their team, the Trail Colonials, the Grand Forks Wanderers, the Ridge Meadow Bruins (Maple Ridge) and the Nelson Grizzlies.The Grizzlies easily won the tournament because they won all their games and had the most ‘tries’ – goal attempts.last_img read more

Leinster Senior Hurling Semi-Final fixed for Portlaoise

first_imgDetails of the Leinster Senior Hurling Semi-Final between Offaly and Galway have been announced this morning. The game will be held in O’Moore Park Portlaoise on Sunday the 19th of June with the game throwing in at 3.30. Kilkenny and Dublin meet in the other Leinster Semi-Final this Saturday evening in Portlaoise.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img

SDG&E uses a mobile app as next step in “Green Button”

first_imgSan Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) is committed to being a trusted energy advisor to our customers, and we are focused on providing innovative and user-friendly solutions to help customers take control of their energy use and reduce their bills.We have developed innovative ways to educate customers about how they can use energy more efficiently and play a vital role in conservation efforts. Our personalized, integrated, and user-friendly solutions give customers greater choice, convenience, and control over their energy use and their utility bills. In fact, more than 25,000 of our customers have downloaded their data using the “Green Button,” as part of an industry-led initiative that was inspired by a call to action from the White House. Our Green Button online toolOpens in a new window provides customers with easy access to up to 13 months of detailed energy consumption data to help them better manage their energy use and conserve.To take our customer relationships to the next level, we recently partnered with Candi ControlsOpens in a new window to develop the exciting new PowerTools app to help SDG&E customers securely identify ways to make smarter choices in their energy use habits and decisions, improving efficiency and lowering costs. PowerTools was the first Green Button Connect app available to SDG&E customers, and it allows customers to view their personalized energy use information and use tools to find new ways to save energy. The PowerTools app is currently available on iOS and select Android platforms.With PowerTools, customers can check recent energy use, set and manage energy saving goals, and track weather patterns related to energy use. Additional features include access to the SDG&E outage map, online bill payment, environmental impact information, historical use analysis, and an overview of actual use and savings relative to history.When sharing customer data online, security is of the highest concern. We’re very proud to say that PowerTools is the first app in the nation to receive certification through the TRUSTed Smart Grid Privacy ProgramOpens in a new window, a self-regulatory program that certifies that companies use responsible privacy practices as they collect and share consumer smart grid data.Since developing apps is not one of our core competencies, we were very pleased to find a partner like Candi Controls to develop this with us, and look forward to continuing to work with a variety of vendors as the list of Green Button app options for customers continues to grow. Expect to see more of this type of collaboration between utilities and software providers in the future.last_img read more