EB15: Ritchey adds more cyclocross, gravel & road wheels, nifty mini tools and world’s…

first_imgEvery year, Ritchey has some new iteration of his wheels. Sometimes there’s a new disc brake option, sometimes one’s a bit wider, and so forth. For 2016, there are four new models worthy of calling out, a couple of which will make for fantastic cyclocross or gravel race hoops, and two for more traditional (or even “classic”) road bikes.Above, the new WCS Apex 38 Disc carbon wheels use their two-piece Centerlock disc hubs with all-new, disc specific 38mm deep carbon rims. They’re 18.4mm wide on the inside, and they’re tubeless ready, so they’ll pair up nicely with the also-new tubeless ready Shield WCS 700×35 tires… The rims get their own special layup and resin for the disc brake version. They’re laced 2-cross with 24 spokes on both front and rear.The Shield WCS tubeless ready tire weighs in at 398g, just 24g heavier than the non-tubeless version, and gets a 120tpi casing and dual compound rubber to be grippy in the corners and fast in the straights.The hubs use Ritchey’s offset flanges to improve spoke bracing angle and keep them from rubbing against each other. The rear hub has larger bearings on the driveside for better durability. Wheelset weight is 1,747g (827g F/920g R). Compatible with standard quick release and thru axles.A rim brake version is also available, weighing in at 1,560g (685g F/875g R), but uses the Phantom hubs (see below), which are QR only.If your game is stepped up to tubulars (though we’d argue tubeless is on the level), the new WCS Apex Carbon 36 Disc Tubulars are your wheels. They use the same hubs as the 38mm deep clinchers above, but switch to a 36mm deep, 24mm wide full carbon tubular rim. That means they’re thru-axle ready, including both 12mm and 15mm options for front. Weight is 1,571g (739g F/832g R).The SuperLogic Zeta II wheels may look like carbon at first glance, but they’re actually alloy with an electro-ceramic surface hardening treatment that both protects the rim and improves braking performance in wet conditions.Called LogiCote, it’s micron thin but should last a long time, which has the bonus effect of helping your rims last longer because the brake pads won’t wear down the sidewalls as quickly.It’s textured, but in a concentric pattern that shouldn’t make the squealing sounds that other textured braking surfaces can (Mavic, we’re looking at you…even though we love the performance of Exalith).The rims are 17mm wide on the inside, and the rear has an asymmetric profile to improve dish.These wheels claim to have Ritchey’s best stiffness to weight ratio, coming in at just 1,391g (593g F/798g R). They’re built with 20/24 DT Aero Comp spokes and alloy nipples laced to Ritchey’s Phantom Flange hubs. The hubs are impressive not just for their weights (70g F/207g R), but because they use J-bend spokes all around, have a 6-pawl, 12-point engagement and staggered driveside flange that keeps the spokes from rubbing together. On top of all that, they pop apart without tools, making them easier to pack if you’re using one of Ritchey’s growing line of Breakaway frames. How? because the freehub body can pop off with the cassette attached, letting the axle slide out and making it all very flat.For those with a classic bike that wants to keep a classic look but gain modern day performance, the Zeta alloy wheels with Phantom hubs now come in silver. For thoroughly modern, the new WCS Carbon Solostreem integrated bar/stem comes in at just 350g by molding the two parts together into an ergonomic, aerodynamic start to your cockpit. It’s available in three widths, with various stem lengths for each: 40cm (80/90/100mm), 42cm (90/100/110/120mm) and 44cm (90/100/110/120/130mm). All three have a 84º stem angle (read: -16º, or roughly flat), with 126mm drop and 75mm reach.To go with your ‘cross or gravel bike, the new Evomax handlebar comes in two flavors – WCS with triple butted 7050 alloy at 270g and Comp in double butted 6061 at 292g. It’s designed with a 12º outward flare to the drops, giving you extra wrist clearance and leverage when it’s boogie time. A slightly flattened top section with 4º backsweep makes it comfortable the rest of the time.Check our outdoor demo coverage for the full story on the new WCS XC pedals and their Trail counterpart, but here’s the nutshell: Better shoe support thanks to flattened platforms on either side of the pedal, and a fixed hook at the front makes engagement and disengagement quicker and more solid and reliable.All of the changes were the result of feedback from sponsored riders like Nino Schurter and crew…though they ended up much beefier than some of the prototypes they were running last year. That means weight went up a bit, to 298g, from the 240g per pair of the originals we tested. The new Trail version weighs in at 347g per pair thanks to the outer cage that gives you more foot support.For the non pros, there’s the new Comp pedal, which gets the same fixed front cleat hook and platforms, but in a bit heavier and much more colorful package. Weight is 331g with a cast alloy body and chromoly spindle.The new WCS TrueGrip X lock-on grips bring things about as thin as you can get. Grip diameter is just 30mm, putting just a thin layer of Kraton dual density material between your palm and the bar. Weight is 93g, width is 103mm, and they’re available in black, red, yellow, green, blue and light blue. A Comp level version provides a slip-on version that does away with the lock rings but adds pink and white colors.The star of the grip show is the new SuperLogic Ergo TrueGrip. The shape is fantastically comfortable, and it’s been available as a WCS edition before, but that one weighed in at a portly 36g without end plugs. Thanks to a new “ultra-light nano foam”, the SuperLogic version cuts that all the way down to 8.5g…for the pair!Two new tools join the collection. In the middle are the Barkeeper Levers. They tuck into your handlebar ends when not needed, saving a bit of space in your saddle bag or pocket. They weigh in at 16g and retail for $15 each, sold individually.Up front, the CPR12 mini tool combines all the basics into a light, compact package and doesn’t skimp – there’s even a chain breaker! Other tools include 2/3/4/5/6/8 hex keys, Torx T20, Phillips screwdriver, tire lever and a hidden bottle opener. Hopefully they’ll switch that to a T25 at some point, otherwise a great looking tool that’s just 92g.Ritchey also had several new items at Eurobike’s outdoor demo, including the Ascent touring bike, a steel trail hardtail mountain bike and some aggressive looking tires to go with it, and more! Check them all out here.RitcheyLogic.comcenter_img Gorgeous.Bridging the gap between classic and new is the WCS Carbon NeoClassic handlebar. It’s a modern carbon monocoque bar with matte UD finish, but its shape is the traditional round bend and long, flat lower hand position of old-school handlebars. Weight is 339g for a 42cm width. Reach is 73mm, drop is 128mm. The center section is extended so it’s compatible with clip-on aero bars and all manner of out-front computer/camera mounts.last_img read more

Women’s team bounces back at Iowa

first_imgWomen’s team bounces back at IowaThe men’s tennis team lost both of its matches on the road this weekend.Maddy Fox, Daily File PhotoSenior Paula Rincon-Otero competes against Iowa State at the Baseline Tennis Center on Sunday, Mar. 6. Jack WhiteMarch 28, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Gophers women’s tennis team split the singles matches in both its duals over the weekend, leaving the doubles point to decide the outcome of each. The Gophers (11-7, 3-2 Big Ten) and Huskers split the No. 1 and No. 2 doubles matches on Friday, but Nebraska took the doubles point by winning the No. 3 match 7-6.  “We were disappointed we didn’t get the Nebraska match,” head coach Chuck Merzbacher said. “The only way to respond is come back and get Iowa. Any match on the road in the Big Ten, you just got to battle. We won a very close doubles point [against Iowa], and that was important. We were in every single match that we played.” Nebraska defeated the team at home on Friday 5-2, and the Gophers lost to Iowa 4-1 on the road on Sunday.  “We’re missing too much,” head coach Geoff Young said. “We have to keep our confidence at a higher level so we’re sure of our shots.” The Gophers then split the singles matches with their opponent again, but this time, they earned the victory. Weber and sophomore Felix Corwin’s singles matches went unfinished. “If you’re a really tough team, you’re going to just rebound,” Merzbacher said. “It’s not that bad things are going to happen to you; it’s how you respond.” Senior Jessika Mozia won in the No. 4 singles spot to stop a four-match losing streak while playing through an injury. Minnesota lost the doubles point and the dual at Nebraska 4-3 on Friday but rebounded to defeat Iowa on the road 4-3 on Sunday.center_img The Minnesota men’s tennis team lost both of its matches over the weekend to start a long stretch of Big Ten play.  The two teams then each won three singles matches to give the dual to the Huskers. Minnesota also lost the doubles point on Sunday to the Hawkeyes, and sophomore Matic Spec was the team’s only player to win a singles match. Senior Ruben Weber and junior Jeremy Lynn combined to win two singles matches for the Gophers, but the team lost the other four matches. Minnesota (6-11, 0-3 Big Ten) lost the doubles point against Nebraska to start off its second Big Ten dual of the year. Men’s team loses two matches “I just kind of kept playing,” Spec said. “I’m just trying to improve, trying to be more confident when I play and have a better game plan, and today it worked out.” Minnesota managed to win the doubles point on Sunday at Iowa, earning victories in the No. 1 and No. 3 spots. last_img read more

UC President Janet Napolitano And Triad’s Thom Mason Present $599,600 Grant To LANL Foundation

first_imgNew Mexico Lt. Gov. Howie Morales spoke on behalf of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham at the event. The Foundation is assessing and filling gaps in the LANL Scholars program, increasing scholarship funding for applicants with financial need, as well as initiating a pilot program to provide on-campus and online support services for LANL Scholars throughout their college careers. “The investment by Triad in education in the region allows LANL Foundation to help teachers achieve certifications that strengthen their practice and increase their pay, to increase academic success for more college students, and to grow a STEM ecosystem in Northern New Mexico that improves STEM education, collaboration and job opportunities,” LANL Foundation President/CEO Jenny Parks said. “We are thrilled to be entrusted with this partnership with Triad and will work hard to make positive change for our students and their families.” Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Foundation’s mission to “inspire excellence in education and learning in Northern New Mexico through innovative programming, collaboration and advocacy” has received a major boost with a $599,600 grant from Los Alamos National Laboratory operator Triad National Security, LLC. “Throughout our long affiliation with Los Alamos, the University of California and our partners have always recognized the importance of giving back to the communities surrounding the lab. After all, vibrant, thriving and resilient communities and workers are essential to the lab’s future work and success,” Napolitano said at the event. Coronado High School STEM Challenge team conducts research along the Rio Chama and works to engineer a real-time aquatic detection system. www.lanlfoundation.org/coronado-stem-challenge. Courtesy/LANLF “The LANL Foundation has provided robust education and learning opportunities in Northern New Mexico for more than 20 years,” Napolitano said. “Their focus on expanding K–12 STEM education, building the leadership and capacity of local teachers, advocating for excellence in schools and supporting college access for New Mexico students remains a vital asset to this community.” LANL FOUNDATION News:Triad grant supports K-12 STEM education, teacher growth and LANL Scholars program “There are some things that we can’t do with federal funds, and these contributions are part of our Community Commitment Plan. As Triad, as the contractor that manages the lab,” Mason said. “It’s a corporate commitment to do some of the things you can’t do with federal funds, and that includes things like the Scholarship Program that the LANL Foundation runs, and the RDC activities on workforce development. They’re tied to diversifying the regional economy and, in some cases, may be supporting things that are kind of outside the areas where the lab is working, so we can’t use our federal funds for that. But as a corporate citizen in the community, Triad can use our corporate resources in a philanthropic mode to help round out the story.” The grant was one of two announced during the event as part of Triad’s Community Commitment Plan, which leverages direct community investments in education, economic diversity and philanthropic giving. The Regional Development Corporation (RDC) also received $200,000 to support workforce development at six regional colleges and universities in Northern New Mexico. Stories about LANL Foundation’s work in education may be found at www.lanlfoundation.org/impact. Work to increase interest and opportunities in STEM involves the creation of a Northern New Mexico STEM Hub to boost collaboration among local and statewide programs, inclusion in the national STEMx™ Network, career pathway mapping, funding for high schools teams to participate in the New Mexico Governor’s STEM Challenge, and grant funding for high-impact STEM programs in the region. Los Alamos National Laboratory Director and Triad President Thom Mason explained that Triad’s Community Commitment Plan builds on the positive impact in the region that comes from the Laboratory’s support for education and economic development projects, and from its own procurement and hiring. University of California (UC) President Janet Napolitano made the Triad grant announcement at a community event Sept. 12. UC is a partner in the Triad consortium, along with Texas A&M University and Battelle Memorial Institute. LANL Scholar Caitlyn Cruz creates sustainable environmental change for her community. www.lanlfoundation.org/caitlyn-cruz. Courtesy/LANLF “The Regional Development Corporation and the LANL Foundation have long been champions for building stronger communities right here in Northern New Mexico. For that we are grateful,” Morales said. “As key partners in educational development with LANL, I believe that today’s financial commitments to bolster these community outreach activities will yield real success, not only with student achievement, but, more importantly, with student engagement.” With the grant, a comprehensive status report on challenges, gaps and opportunities in the teaching profession is being conducted. In the interest of growing and retaining local teachers, LANL Foundation is funding National Board Certification for Teachers (NBCT) in Northern New Mexico school districts and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Certification for classroom paraprofessionals and educational assistants. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Certification needs and teacher training options also are being researched for possible support. University of California President Janet Napolitano, right, and LANL Director and Triad President Thom Mason, left, present funding to LANL Foundation President/CEO Jenny Parks and board members Bill Wadt, Denise Thronas, Nan Sauer, Billie Blair, Tania Sanchez, Elmer Torres, Wilmer Chavarria and Hervey Juris during a recent event. Courtesy/LANLF Melisha Martinez, TESOL certification candidate, builds skills to better serving dual-language students at La Tierra Montessori School www.lanlfoundation.org/melisha-martinez. Courtesy/LANLFlast_img read more