Month: February 2020

Blackwater nabs Belo, Ginebra picks Ferrer; 3 teams still undecided

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise EDITORS’ PICK We are young MOST READ Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila At the same time, a very reliable source told the Inquirer that three teams have yet to make up their minds, leaving Von Pessumal and two others on the table.Alaska, GlobalPort and TNT KaTropa are the teams yet to decide on their selections and would likely wait until the Draft proper.Blackwater has a great chance of rebuilding its franchise, with the Elite to have at least four of the 42 aspirants in practice today. Among them is Raphael Banal, whom they would want to see up close before deciding.A separate Blackwater source said team owner Dioceldo Sy was “ecstatic” after tabbing Belo, and is elated at the prospect of having the likes of Banal available in the Draft proper.Banal has the distinction of being the first Filipino to come from a local high school and enrolling straight in a US college to play collegiate ball, starring for Victor University for two years starting in 2012.ADVERTISEMENT PBA teams make Gilas selections; Belo goes to Blackwater Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughtercenter_img Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND The other Cadet pool members tapped during the marathon special meeting among team representatives will be bared this Sunday during the Draft proper at Robinsons Place in Manila.READ: PBA teams make Gilas selections; Belo goes to BlackwaterFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentAOther members of the Gilas pool who were already selected will also be announced on Sunday and in the teams’ alphabetical order.The only thing that remained constant during the discussions was that Blackwater selected first. 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas The 6-foot-2 point guard opted out of Ateneo after a great high school career and Philippine Youth Team participation together with Kiefer Ravena.Banal will be coming into the Draft as a potential star because of his point guard skills and great outside range.“Blackwater will definitely revolve around Belo,” the source told the Inquirer. “But at the same time, Mr. (Dioceldo) Sy is very happy that they have a chance to tap another potential franchise player, that’s why they want to see the prospects up close.” Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Mac Belo at the 2016 PBA Draft Combine. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAfter exploring several options in how to tap members of the Gilas Cadet pool in the coming PBA Draft, the teams Thursday performed their special selection process with Blackwater grabbing gunslinger Mac Belo No. 1 overall.Phoenix Petroleum got Fil-American Matthew Wright and Barangay Ginebra, the new Governors’ Cup champion, snagged talented former Santo Tomas gunner Kevin Ferrer as team representatives practically did away with the natural picking order.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

Government subsidies serving to prop up destructive high-seas fishing: study

first_imgMore than half of fisheries on the world’s high seas would be running a loss without the billions of dollars in government subsidies that keep the ecologically destructive industry afloat, a recent study suggests.The researchers described the annual subsidies as being far in excess of the net economic benefit from fishing in these international waters.They called for greater transparency by governments and substantial reforms of high-seas fisheries in a bid to improve the management of the industry they labeled as ecologically and economically unsustainable. Much of the fishing that takes place in international waters would be unprofitable without the billions of dollars in subsidies pumped in by governments to sustain the ecologically destructive industry, a recent study has found.International waters, or the high seas, are not governed by any one international body or agency, and account for nearly two-thirds of the ocean’s surface. There is currently no comprehensive management structure in place to protect the marine life that relies on them.Researchers poring over information for fishing in these zones in 2014, the most recent year for which complete datasets are available, concluded that 54 percent of high-seas fishing would be in the red if not for governments covering some of the industry’s costs.In their study published June 6 in the journal Science Advances, the researchers noted that labor exploitation and underreported catches could also explain how some operators could afford to keep fishing in the high seas, where species like tuna are often overfished, and migratory sharks — 44 percent of which are threatened species — are often killed as bycatch.“While our analysis is for a single year, the slight increase in high seas catch and revenue, coupled with the high and constant price of fuel between 2010-2014, suggest that our estimate of profits is likely to be representative of, or slightly higher than, the average state during the first half of this decade,” the researchers wrote.Heat map of global fishing activity in 2016. Image courtesy of Global Fishing Watch.Using data from new satellite technologies that track fishing vessels, the researchers pegged the total costs of high-seas fishing in 2014 at between $6.2 billion and $8 billion.The total fisheries catch in these waters was estimated at 4.4 million metric tons, with aggregate revenue of $7.6 billion, the report said, suggesting that the margin for the industry ranged between $1.4 billion in profits to $364 million in losses.Meanwhile, they estimated that governments subsidized high-seas fisheries to the tune of $4.2 billion that same year, “far exceeding the net economic benefit of fishing in the high seas.”This led to the conclusion that the industry was far from profitable, thereby necessitating government support.“One would think that subsidies are used to help industries in trouble; this is the case in the high seas, because without subsidies more than half of the fishing would not be economically rational,” Enric Sala, executive director of the National Geographic Society’s Pristine Seas project and lead author of the study, told Mongabay in an email.Some government subsidies for fishing are put to good use for activities such as sustainable fisheries management, regulation enforcement, and empowerment of small-scale fishers. However, the subsidizing of the high-seas fishing industry amounts to “a blatant case of corporate welfare, where powerful industrial lobbies also fish for taxpayer’s money to increase their profits,” Sala said.Sala and his team estimated that some 10 million hours of fishing occur each year across up to 57 percent of the high seas, or an area spanning 132 million square kilometers (51 million square miles).They identified fishing hotspots near Peru, Argentina and Japan, which were dominated by Chinese, Taiwanese and South Korean squid fishing fleets. They also found that deep-sea bottom trawling, a common practice in high-seas fishing that destroys ocean ecosystems, was prevalent in the northern Atlantic, while tuna fleets abounded in the central and western Pacific.Purse seine vessels use a large bag-like net, which they close around an entire school of fish. Image courtesy of C. Ortiz Rojas/NOAA.Five countries accounted for 64 percent of the global high-seas fishing revenue: China (21 percent), Taiwan (13 percent), Japan (11 percent), South Korea (11 percent) and Spain (8 percent). The researchers estimated that China and Taiwan accrued most of the losses in high-seas fishing without government subsidies.The paper also raised the possibility of individual fishing companies catching more than they reported to fisheries agencies, hence making more money than they claimed while still pushing governments for subsidies.“Governments should not subsidize activities that perpetuate overfishing and destruction of the marine environment,” Sala said.The researchers have called for more transparency by governments and substantial reforms of high-seas fisheries in a bid to improve the management of an industry that they label as ecologically and economically unsustainable.“This implies that through targeted subsidy reforms, we could save taxpayers money, rebuild fish stocks, and eventually lead to higher value, lower volume fisheries,” said co-author Christopher Costello, a professor of resource economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.The World Trade Organization in December 2017 was expected to reach an agreement to stop subsidizing illegal fishing activities, but the delegates failed to reach a deal due to procedural hurdles. They instead agreed on a new goal for reaching a comprehensive fisheries subsidy by the time of the next ministerial conference in 2019.Some of the authors of the new report have suggested that closing large areas of oceans to fishing activity — including the entire high seas — could both achieve conservation goals and increase the economic benefits of fishing migratory species, particularly when they are overfished.The ecological benefits of not disrupting high-seas ecosystems — the economic value of carbon storage alone in these waters is estimated at $74 billion to $220 billion a year, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts — could far outweigh the value of high-seas fishing, which accounts for just 6 percent of global catches.The United Nations General Assembly last December started negotiations to create an international treaty to protect the marine environments of the high seas. The negotiation process, spread across four meetings, will kick off in September this year, and the final text of the treaty is expected by the end of 2020.“We have a great opportunity to protect big chunks of the high seas, which would help the marine environment, but also make sense economically,” Sala said.Banner image of a commercial fishing trawler at work, courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Economics, Environment, Environmental Economics, Environmental Policy, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Illegal Fishing, Marine, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish, Subsidies, Sustainability center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

$25m in funding to help African gov’ts prosecute poachers, traffickers

first_imgThe African Wildlife Foundation has pledged $25 million to projects aimed at combating the illegal wildlife trade across the continent over the next four years.The Nairobi-based NGO invests in outfitting wildlife rangers, training sniffer dogs to detect illicit shipments, and community-based development.AWF president Kaddu Sebunya emphasized the need to invest in homegrown solutions to the crisis when he announced the funding at the Illegal Wildlife Trade conference, held Oct. 11-12 in London. A prominent African wildlife conservation NGO has committed $25 million to help protect iconic fauna from poaching and habitat loss across the continent by investing in African institutions and people.“We are seeing recovery and stabilization of some critical wildlife populations,” Kaddu Sebunya, president of the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF), said in a statement. “We know what is working and it’s time to scale up the investment to combat this serious threat.”The Nairobi-based organization made the announcement on Oct. 11 during the Illegal Wildlife Trade conference in London. The money will complement more than $13 million that AWF says it has used to support projects aimed at countering the illegal trade of wildlife and wildlife products.The African Wildlife Foundation’s work includes programs to stop the loss of habitat for large carnivores, such as cheetahs. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.“If we can keep wildlife safe from poachers, make wildlife products difficult to move around, actively involve key local players, and dampen the demand for wildlife products, then Africa’s magnificent animals have a fighting chance,” Philip Muruthi, AWF’s chief scientist, said in the statement.Current AWF projects include training sniffer dogs credited with detecting the presence of more than 250 illicit shipments of wildlife products; engaging with communities to encourage economic development that also supports conservation; and equipping wildlife rangers with the tools they need to catch poachers.This infusion of funds will go toward bolstering the capacity of authorities, specifically judges and prosecutors, to hold poachers and traffickers accountable, the group says. Along with continuing its efforts to protect habitat for animals such as elephants, rhinos and big cats, this investment in the capacity of African governments is directed toward giving them the tools to face this issue head-on.The AWF also supports projects to halt the poaching of critically endangered black rhinos. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“The trade routes trace back to decisions made on the ground, and while we are focusing this week on the commodities traded from dead wildlife, our interest is in seeing the living species remain part of modern Africa,” Sebunya said. “We know from our work that leadership at every level — from the families living in wildlife-rich areas to the heads of state — is an essential ingredient.”Banner image of an African elephant by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, Anti-poaching, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Black Rhino, Cats, Cheetahs, Community Development, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Trade, Indigenous Communities, Law, Law Enforcement, Lions, Mammals, Parks, Poachers, Poaching, Rhinos, Sustainable Development, trafficking, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

Amazon and climate science threatened if Bolsonaro elected Brazil’s president (commentary)

first_imgFake news and pseudo-science have been used as propaganda by supporters of the far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro during his presidential election bid, according to a group of 17 Latin American scientists.The lack of defined environmental positions within the candidate’s political platform is of great concern to the scientific community.The pledge to fuse the agricultural and environmental ministries, expand agricultural and mining activities especially in the Amazon, and the promise made in the media to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, could make a Bolsonaro presidency dangerous not only for Brazil but for the world.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily Mongabay. A full list of authors is presented at the end of the commentary. Eighteen Latin American scientists have expressed concern over the environmental policy proposals of presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, who will be in a runoff election with candidate Fernando Haddad on Sunday, 28 October. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Brazil is the guardian of the largest tropical forest on Earth, lays claim to one of the largest cultivated land areas in the world, and possesses the largest population of any South American nation. As a result, a rising politician there who is ignoring global climate change issues and the environment should be of great concern not only to Brazilians but all humanity.Time is running out for the world to take action to mitigate climate change. Especially, with superpowers like the US and China doing virtually nothing to decarbonize their economies. Now, Brazil is on the way to electing Jair Bolsonaro president – its own version of Donald Trump, with all the global implications this could involve.According to a political platform registered with Brazil’s Superior Electoral Court (TSE), Bolsonaro’s proposed political positions suffer from an important lack of measures with respect to the environment and on how to mitigate climate change. His platform does, however, support policies which are of great concern to the scientific community, including the fusion of the agricultural and environmental ministries (with a ministerial head who would be “suggested by the agribusiness producers”), as well as the stimulation and expansion of agricultural and mining activities in the Amazon. Additionally, there is no mention of a transition to green energy.Rio Negro in the heart of the Amazon basin, as seen from space. Image courtesy of NASA.Importantly, although it isn’t mentioned in his political platform, Bolsonaro has declared during interviews with the press his intention of withdrawing Brazil from the Paris Climate Agreement, avoiding any future national commitment by Brazil to greenhouse gas emission reductions, adaptation and mitigation plans. This climate-denial policy – encouraged by Trump’s example – puts the planet at high risk given the short timeframe that we now have to drastically change global society in order to keep global warming below the 1.5 degree Celsius threshold, as established in the recent report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.In particular, the exploitation and deforestation of Amazonia supported by Bolsonaro, could lead to drastic negative changes at many ecological levels. Those policies could increase direct warming effects; lead to a dramatic loss of biodiversity; exacerbate climatic extremes; and negatively impact regional weather dynamics.In addition, Bolsonaro fails to present efficient measures for empowering science in Brazil. According to the candidate, universities and science should step in line behind entrepreneurs and companies. He says that basic science and the environmental sciences will not be a priority for his government, likely meaning more budget cuts.Hyacinth macaws in flight. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Meanwhile, fake news in support of Bolsonaro is spreading fast and efficiently in Brazil, with supporters using pseudo-scientific arguments. Even as misinformation surges, almost out of control, the presidential candidate and his team confuse things further with contradictions regarding policies and positions.Whether the candidate has changed his mind on some fundamental environmental issues, or is only altering his statements to get more votes, it is difficult to say. However, any stated position that is not supportive of the environment; traditional and indigenous populations and their cultures; and the protection of basic human rights, stands against the Brazilian Constitution of 1988.A Bolsonaro presidency – with its lack of social-environmental protections for the Amazon and for the global climate – represents a huge setback for Brazil and for the planet.Commentary authors: Eliane Gomes-Alves; Ana María Yáñez-Serrano; Jorge Saturno; Samara Carbone; Pamela Dominutti; Sebastián Diez; Stefan Wolff; Janaína Nascimento; Ana Paula Pires Florentino; Natália Targhetta; Blanca Yáñez Serrano; Lucas Emilio Hoeltgebaum; Simone Silva; André Luís Diniz dos Santos; Nora Zannoni; Cybelli Barbosa; Marcia Munik Mendes Cabral. Correction: This commentary was originally credited to 18 authors. However one of the writers originally credited asked after publication to have his name removed from the piece. Mongabay has complied with this request.Citations:Barlow, J., Lennox, G. D., Ferreira, J., Berenguer, E., Lees, A. C., Nally, R. M., … Gardner, T. A. (2016). Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation. Nature, 535(7610), 144–147. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18326Barlow, J., França, F., Gardner, T. A., Hicks, C. C., Lennox, G. D., Berenguer, E., … Graham, N. A. J. (2018). The future of hyperdiverse tropical ecosystems. Nature, 559(7715), 517–526. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0301-1Chambers, J. Q., & Artaxo, P. (2017). Deforestation size influences rainfall. Nature Climate Change, 7(3), 175–176. https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3238Lennox, G. D., Gardner, T. A., Thomson, J. R., Ferreira, J., Berenguer, E., Lees, A. C., … Barlow, J. (2018). Second rate or a second chance? Assessing biomass and biodiversity recovery in regenerating Amazonian forests. Global Change Biology. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14443Scott, C. E., Monks, S. A., Spracklen, D. V., Arnold, S. R., Forster, P. M., Rap, A., … Wilson, C. (2018). Impact on short-lived climate forcers increases projected warming due to deforestation. Nature Communications, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02412-4Banner image: Hyacinth macaws. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A Cocoi heron (Ardea cocoi). Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay. Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Controversial, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New space lasers offer best 3D look at global forests yet

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri boreal forests, Conservation Solutions, Forests, LiDAR, Mapping, Monitoring, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Sensors, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildtech Forest monitoring has increasingly turned to satellites over the past several decades, and 2018 was no exception.In the last few months, NASA launched two sensors into space that will play a prominent role in monitoring forest biomass and structure over the next decade: the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) now attached to the International Space Station, and the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2).These two satellites, which in combination provide complete coverage of the planet, are equipped with lidar sensors that record forest structure in 3D, contributing to an ongoing wave of large-scale forest ecosystem measurements. Researchers and forest managers working to record and reduce the rapid loss of forests are now armed with a new tool to monitor vegetation across the globe. In December 2018, a SpaceX rocket launched the NASA-engineered Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) sensor up to the International Space Station to gather data on the structure and extent of forests.Scientists have increasingly relied on remote sensing methods to estimate the extent of forest landscapes, in particular collecting data from space at a large scale. Over the next several years, GEDI will provide the most accurate lidar (light detection and ranging) data on tropical and temperate forests ever to be collected from space.Satellite lidar systems determine vegetation structure by emitting lasers down to Earth at a known distance from the planet’s surface and measuring the time it takes for the lasers to return to their origin. As the satellite orbits the Earth, its lasers bounce off different features of a landscape. Shorter return times correspond to taller features, such as the top of a forest canopy, while longer return times correspond to shorter features, such as grassy plains. Where elevation of an area is known, very precise heights of vegetation features can be determined across the landscape.NASA’s Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) sensor launched to the International Space Station in December 2018 offers a 3D view of temperate and tropical forests. Video by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.The benefit of GEDI’s lidar is its ability to collect forest structure data in three dimensions, which enables scientists to not just categorize different types of land cover but also record vegetation canopy height and tree density, which other satellite sensors cannot. GEDI’s lasers will also penetrate the forest canopy to map understory growth, surveillance that no satellite to date has been able to do and would otherwise be near impossible without the difficult fieldwork of measuring forest biomass and carbon storage from the ground.Scientists agree that forests are disappearing rapidly and globally, but the speed with which the world is de-greening and how much of Earth’s carbon and biodiversity are lost along with forests are not well understood. The amount of carbon released when forests are cut down or burned depends on the amount of biomass the forests contain. Carbon emissions from deforestation play a substantial role in assessing the impact of human activity on climate.“The largest gap is that we do not know the existing carbon stocks of the Earth’s forests,” Dr. Ralph Dubayah, the principal investigator of GEDI and professor of geography at the University of Maryland, told Mongabay. “Canopy height provides a direct link to a tree’s weight because just as with humans, larger trees weigh more than younger trees. About half a tree’s biomass is carbon. So if we know the heights globally, we can make much better maps of global forest carbon.”Satellite-mounted lidar can also help scientists record how long it has been since a forest starting growing or was last cut down, also known as its successional state. Trees in old-growth forests tend to be bulkier and taller and therefore store more carbon and offer unique ecosystems that younger forests don’t.Powerful lidar sensors, such as the GEDI satellite sensor, can record layers of vegetation structure even in dense tropical rainforests. Lidar data collected by planes or satellites produces three-dimensional depictions of the vegetation below. Image courtesy of GEDI team.“Conventional satellite data can show you when a patch of forest has been lost, disturbed or degraded,” said Dubayah, “but you don’t know how much that deforestation has contributed to atmospheric CO2. The net balance between how much you lose through deforestation and how much you gain through regrowth is one of the largest uncertainties in the global carbon cycle.”Combined, satellite lidar sensors scan entire planet’s surfaceGEDI was not the only lidar sensor NASA sent to space in 2018. ICESat-2, a satellite launched in mid-September 2018, is also beaming lasers down from space as it orbits the earth at a speed of 4.3 miles per second. Although ICESat-2’s primary mission, and namesake, is monitoring polar ice caps, the lidar lasers shot from its sensor will also record elevation and structure of the vegetation, ocean, and rocky surfaces surrounding the polar regions, including those of the boreal forests. These high-latitude data would complement those of areas closer to the equator generated by GEDI, said Dr. Joe MacGregor, a NASA glaciologist on the ICESat team. “Along with ICESat-2’s polar coverage, GEDI will cover between 51° latitude North and 51° latitude South to round out the picture.”ICESat-2, a lidar satellite launched in September 2018, will complement GEDI measurements of tropical and temperature forests with its own extensive coverage of boreal forests near polar regions. Video by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.ICESat-2 is the successor to ICESat-1, which launched in 2003 and orbited until 2010. ICESat-1, which also had a lidar sensor, enabled NASA scientists to create the first global map of an average forest canopy height for every square kilometer (0.4 square miles). The new ICESat will yield an updated global map of canopy heights that is expected to be 1,000 times higher resolution than the ICESat-1 map, and GEDI will map forest canopy metrics at an even higher resolution (a grid of 25-meter cells).The new ICESat is equipped with a particular flavor of lidar that is excellent for mapping the depth of ice sheets and the canopy height of forests, but it has difficulty penetrating the dense vegetation of tropical rainforests—the forests that GEDI is conveniently positioned to map with its vegetation-optimized lidar sensors.“We have a project looking at merging GEDI and ICESat-2 data for estimating biomass,” Dr. Laura Duncanson of NASA told Mongabay. “The two science teams are working closely together.” Duncanson said she and members of the ICESat-2 team had joined each other’s meetings and plan to continue their coordinated efforts to integrate data.Oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo with newly cleared hills in foreground surrounded by forest. Satellite lidar data can track when the structure of forests changes, such as when deforestation or degradation occurs, as when a natural forest supporting hundreds tree species is cleared and replanted with a monoculture such as oil palm. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Biomass monitoring has become increasingly important with the onset of carbon accounting programs such as REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation), which aim to provide monetary incentives to conserve forests that offset the potential value lost by not cutting down forests. Knowledge of how much carbon is stored in a given area of forest is crucial for establishing such offsetting programs, although international efforts to establish emission accountability metrics have continued to fall short of goals. Nonetheless, carbon cap-and-trade markets are growing, as are the prospects of initiating a carbon tax in some economies.Besides biomass and carbon stock measurements, this global-scale lidar data will inform other research as well. Recording canopy height and various metrics of forest complexity at large scales enables scientists to characterize different forest ecosystems. When paired with on-the-ground species distribution data, ecologists can roughly estimate the biodiversity of forests, which can help set conservation priorities. Years of satellite lidar data can also improve understanding of how forest structure changes over time due to tree growth, mortality, and competition.Building and launching satellites requires deep pockets up front but can save researchers a vast amount over time. GEDI’s budget of $94 million pales in comparison to the budgets of the Landsat-9 land monitoring satellite ($885 million) and the European Space Agency’s Copernicus mission ($4.9 billion). The low cost of GEDI is largely thanks to hitching a ride on the International Space Station and expedient progress by NASA scientists and engineers.“Conceiving and creating the technology in such a short span (four years) on this budget has been a major accomplishment,” Dubayah said. “GEDI was completed six months early and under budget, which is nearly unheard of.”Overhead view of a diverse rainforest in Peru’s Amazon. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.A new hope for forests?Although both the GEDI and ICESat-2 lidar sensors will likely last only until 2021 and 2022, respectively, researchers and land managers use the data from ecosystem satellites for many years: ICESat-1 maps are still contributing to conservation science 10 years after the satellite was decommissioned. As the costs of large-scale, high-resolution forest monitoring decrease, so does the availability of data and tools to track land cover change at incredibly fine scales.These two lidar sensors complement the fine-scale (5-meter, or 16.5-foot) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites already in orbit, and the next decade will likely witness the launch of NISAR, a joint initiative between the United States and India, and the European Space Agency’s BIOMASS mission, both of which are assigned to record global environmental changes.In a galaxy far, far away, Jedi see through others with the Force. Starting this year above our own planet, GEDI can now see through the forest. According to Dubayah, the dramatic advances being made in remote sensing technologies will improve scientists’ ability to measure– and therefore better protect– the extent and structure of global forests.“We are entering a new era of ecosystem observation where we can finally get at canopy 3D structure,” he said, “a very exciting development indeed.”CitationNeuenschwander, A., & Pitts, K. (2019). The ATL08 land and vegetation product for the ICESat-2 Mission. Remote Sensing of Environment, 221, 247-259. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2018.11.005FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more